IDLE THOUGHTS:


· Do twins ever realize that one

of them is unplanned?



· What if my dog only brings back my

ball because he thinks I like throwing it?



· If poison expires is it more poisonous

or is it no longer poisonous?



· Which letter is silent in the word

"Scent," the S or the C?



· Why is the letter W, in English, called

double U? Shouldn't it be called double V?



· Maybe oxygen is slowly killing you and

it just takes 75-100 years to fully work.



· Every time you clean something, you

just make something else dirty.



· The word "swims" upside-down is

still "swims".



· Intentionally losing a game of rock,

paper, and scissors is just as hard as trying to win.



· 100 years ago everyone owned a horse

and only the rich had cars. Today everyone

has cars and only the rich own horses.



· Your future self is watching you right now

through memories.



· The doctors that told Stephen Hawking

he had two years to live in 1953 are probably dead.



· If you replace "W" with "T" in "What,

Where and When", you get the answer to each of them.



· Many animals probably need glasses,

but nobody knows it.



· If you rip a hole in a net, there are actually

fewer holes in it than there were before.



· If 2/2/22 falls on a Tuesday, we'll just call

it "2's Day". (It does fall on a Tuesday)





· 100 years ago a Twenty Dollar bill and

a Twenty Dollar gold piece were interchangeable.

Either one would buy a new suit, new shoes

and a night on the town. The Twenty Dollar

gold piece will still do that.
CARD GROUPS

MONDAY
SAMBA
Sign in 10:45 AM
Hosted by Judy Nourse

TUESDAY/THURSDAY - BRIDGE

Weekly Bridge game on Tuesdays in the ladies card room.
9:00 am till noon.
Thursdays 2:00

Even if you have not played in years, we are happy to
welcome you as a weekly player or as a substitute.

Please call Nancy @ 760-984-4584 for more details!

FRIDAY -  SAMBA
Sign in 10:45 AM

If interested contact Donna Nelson
dhateasystreet@msn.com
MEXICAN TRAIN

Wednesday - 12:00 AM

If interested contact Marcy Hauser
marcyhauser@me.com
CRAFTS CLASS

Every Wednesday - 10:00 AM
“The magic is in the making.”











Watercolor
Jewelry
Rock Art
Quilting











Contact: Donna Nelson
dhateasystreet@msn.com
Must be a member of the club to participate in these
events!
All events are held in the Ladies' Lounge
Updated Monday, January 21st, 2019
“The principal purpose of this website is to provide useful information for residents of Bermuda Dunes.  It is not possible, however, for The Blog Folks independently to verify information submitted to us.  
Accordingly, our listing of goods and services is not intended to be, nor should it be construed as, an endorsement.  The purchasers of goods and services listed on our website are encouraged to perform
their own due diligence.”
This website is owned, operated and paid for exclusively by The Blogfolks. We are not affiliated with Riverside County or any other entity.

LIFE IS GOOD IN BERMUDA DUNES
COUNTY
INFORMATION:

Bermuda Dunes
Community Council
Meets the 2nd Thursday
every other month

Supervisor PEREZ office
Victoria Llort
760 863 8211
VLlort@rivco.org

Sheriff's Department
Lt. Todd Pauling
760 863 8990
tpauling@riversidesheriff.org

California Highway Patrol
Office Phil Watkins
760 772 5300

Cal Fire
Chief Mark Brooks
760 343 3510
Mark.Brooks@fire.ca.gov

Code Enforcement
Michael Bowles
Direct No 951-600-6233
mebowles@rivco.org

Brenda Hannah
bhannah@rivco.org

Bermuda Dunes Community
Center/Desert Rec
Tatiana Hinkle
thinkle@drd.us.com
760-347-3484 ext. 134

Bermuda Dunes Airport




79880 Avenue 42, Bermuda
Dunes, CA 92203 ·
PH: (760) 345-2558
AGoodwyn@
BermudaDuesAirport.org

Myoma Water Co
Mark Meeler
General Manager
Myoma Dunes Water
Company
79050 Avenue 42
Bermuda Dunes, CA 92203
760-772-1967  Office
760-345-9761  FAX

GRAFFITI HOTLINE
Desert
1-888-472-3488

All other areas of the County
1-951-955-3333

Riverside County Waste
Resources




Waste Management has a
roadside cleanup program
in the Riverside County they
can be reached at
951-955-6899

Union Pacific RR
Critical Need Phone #
888 877 7267

ILLEGAL DUMPING
1 393 3344 NOT
USEFUL INFO
ABOUT BDSA AND
BDCA
Board Members
Bermuda Dunes Security
Association

Robert Nagles-- Vice President
Chris Hogan-- Treasurer
John Thiele-- Secretary
Don Keprta-- Director
Michael Tanner-- Director
Jack Fox - Director
Robert Nelson - Director

BDSA Meeting
4th Thurs. of every month

BDSA BULLETIN
CLICK
HERE

BDSA
Responsibilities
:

Bermuda Dunes Security
Association (BDSA) is
responsible for streets
(potholes, cracks, street
drainage and dry wells),
Security entry/exit, patrol
vehicles, cable TV
agreement, fee collection
& payment, gates & gate
lights, medians, walls,
guardhouses and all
street/gate signage.

BDSA is managed by
Desert Resort Mgmt
Contact:
John Walters-Clark
760 346 1161

BDSA RULES AND REGS

The Admin Office is open
Monday thru Friday for
questions and concerns.

Resident Login System
is handled by DRM

Admin hours are as follows:

Monday 9 -5
Tuesday 9 - 5
Wednesday 9 - 5
Thursday10-6  
Friday 9 - 5
Saturday Closed         
Sunday Closed

If this is urgent, please
contact Security at:

Telephone Numbers:

Main Gate: 760-360-1322
Main Gate #1
Glass Gate #2
Administration #3

Bermuda Dunes
Home Owner's
Association
Meets
Third Tuesday at
6:00 p.m. each month

EXCEPT AUGUST
Adm Bldg
4:30 PM

President   Charlie Bishop
Vice President. Brett Coor
Secretary. Janet McMurtrey
Board member Kristy Parmelee
Treasure. Mike Soran

Joint Committee Representatives
are Janet McMurtrey and Brett
Coor
s

BDCA is managed by
Desert Resort Mgmt
Contact:
John Walters-Clark
760 346 1161

CC&Rs for BDSA

Here is what
BDCA is
responsible for:

Bermuda Dunes
Community Association
(BDCA) is responsible for
most problems relating to
property owner's home
and lot, dogs,
landscaping, pool
draining, trash cans,
fountains and landscaping
at the main gate.

The Architectural
Committee reports to the
Community Board

Dues are $100 per year
and are payable in
January in lump sum

Architectural Committee
responsibilities

A.  THE MISSION:  As representatives of each
Homeowner, members of the Architectural
Control Committee (ACC), are volunteer
community members.  The ACC, as
established in the CC&R’s, has been charged
with the mission to oversee that each lot and
dwelling within the Community is developed
and maintained in a manner compatible with
its standard aesthetics and quality.

B.  ALL IMPROVEMENTS:  The ACC has the
responsibility to approve or to reject all plans
for real property improvements on all lots
within any subdivision of the Community, and
all properties owned by the Bermuda Dunes
Community Association and Bermuda Dunes
Security Association, prior to commencement
of construction of that improvement.

C. RESPONSIBILITY: The ACC’s goal is to
foster careful design in furtherance of its
responsibility to represent each Homeowner
in the preservation of the architectural and
landscaping aesthetics and character of the
homes within the Community and to monitor,
according to its authority for interpretation,
enforcement of BDCA’s governing
documents.  Utilizing and interpreting the
Guidelines, the ACC will consider the
aesthetic and functional aspects of each
design, including placement of buildings,
landscaping, exterior finishes and materials,
height and bulk, orientation of site lines, etc.  
In addition, the ACC will consider the effect of
the proposed improvement on neighboring
properties and the Community as a whole.

D.  LIMITATION OF RESPONSIBILITY:  The
ACC is not responsible for reviewing nor shall
its approval of any plan or design be deemed
approval of any structural safety or
conformance with building or other codes. The
ACC assumes no responsibility for the
structural or mechanical soundness of
approved designs.

E.  RECORDS:  Records of ACC approvals or
actions will be kept on file, by Tract or Unit
and by Lot number, at the office of the BDCA.

F.  AUTHORITY:  Submissions are required
directly from homeowners, regardless that
they may reside in sub-communities that may
have their own architectural review boards,
guidelines and committees.  The BDCA-ACC
has final authority for approval of projects as
outlined herein. No submittals will be
accepted from sub-community boards or
committees, unless submission is for
common area projects within the sub-
community.

THE BLOGFOLKS CONTACT INFORMATION
Email us: Theblogfolks@bdcommun.com
BERMUDA DUNES
SECURITY ASSOCIATION

CLICK
HERE
FERAL CAT AND KITTY
INFO

REMEMBER...IF YOU ARE
FEEDING FERAL CATS YOU
ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR
THEM










CHECK OUT OUR
'PET PLACE' FOR
ADDITIOAL INFORMATIO
N

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BERMUDA DUNES
COUNTRY
CLUB

CLICK HERE
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Please do your own due
diligence when selecting a
doctor.

Top Doctors 2018 Directory

The following is Palm Springs Life’s
Top Doctors 2018 Directory in
partnership with Castle Connolly
Medical Ltd., a health care research
and information company founded in
1991 by a former medical college
board chairman and president to help
guide consumers to America’s
leading physicians, specialists,
researchers, and hospitals.

ADDICTION PSYCHIATRY
Sean A. Barlow, M.D.
San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital
41990 Cook St., F Bldg., Ste.
2008
Palm Desert, CA 92211
760-674-9777
Addiction/Substance Abuse

ALLERGY & IMMUNOLOGY
Gary I. Greenwald, M.D.
Eisenhower Health
72855 Fred Waring Drive, Ste.
C20
Palm Desert, CA 92260
760-341-9777
Nasal Allergy, Allergy & Asthma,
Pulmonary Disease, Clinical
Trials

Sam J. Weiss, M.D.
Eisenhower Health
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Kiewit
Bldg., Ste. 303
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-346-2070
Asthma & Allergy, Pediatric
Allergy & Immunology, Sinusitis,
Anaphylaxis

CARDIAC
ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY
Hetal R. Bhakta, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center/
Desert Heart Rhythm
Consultants
1100 N. Palm Canyon Drive,
Ste. 206
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-883-1600
Arrhythmias, Atrial Fibrillation,
Pacemakers/Defibrillators

Andrew M. Rubin, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Cardiology Consultants
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Hal B.
Wallis Bldg.
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-346-0642
Atrial Fibrillation,
Pacemakers/Defibrillators,
Arrhythmias

CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE
A Mohammad Abid, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / John F.
Kennedy Memorial Hospital /
The Heart Institute 
Medical
Center
81709 Dr. Carreon Blvd., Ste. A1
Indio, CA 92201
760-863-4666
Interventional Cardiology

Michael Bagheri, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Regional Medical Center / CURE
Cardiovascular Consultants
555 Tachevah Drive, Ste. 1W202
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-323-2174

Leon A. Feldman, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Cardiology Consultants
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Hal B.
Wallis Bldg.
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-346-0642
Arrhythmias, Atrial Fibrillation,
Cardiac Electrophysiology

Damon E. Kelsay, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Cardiology Consultants
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Hal B.
Wallis Bldg.
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-346-0642
Echocardiography

Lester D. Padilla, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Cardiology Consultants
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Hal B.
Wallis Bldg.
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-346-0642

Philip J. Patel, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Cardiology Consultants
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Hal B.
Wallis Bldg.
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-346-0642
Nuclear Cardiology,
Echocardiography, Cardiac
Imaging, Heart Failure

Eric M. Sontz, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Cardiology Consultants
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Hal B.
Wallis Bldg.
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-346-0642
Heart Attack, Nuclear
Cardiology, Colon & Rectal
Surgery

Scott Gering, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Eisenhower
Medical Associates / Mike & Jan
Salta Health Center
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Floor 2,
Ste. A
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-837-8601
Laparoscopic Surgery, Colon &
Rectal Cancer & Surgery

DERMATOLOGY
Pamela Broska, M.D.
West Dermatology
72785 Frank Sinatra Drive, Ste.
101
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-969-5900
Mohs Surgery, Cosmetic
Dermatology, Laser Surgery

Timothy M. Jochen, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ Eisenhower Health / Contour
Dermatology & Cosmetic
Surgery Center
42600 Mirage Road
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-423-4000
Mohs Surgery, Skin Cancer,
Cosmetic Dermatology, Hair
Restoration/Transplant

Timothy F. Richardson, M.D.
Mirage Dermatology
36867 Cook St., Ste. 101
Palm Desert, CA 92211
760-341-1999
Mohs Surgery, Skin Cancer

Wendy E. Roberts, M.D.
35280 Bob Hope Drive, Ste. 105
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-346-4262
Cosmetic Dermatology, Geriatric
Dermatology,
Dermatopathology, 
Kybella for
under-chin fat

DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY
Jerry Y. Chang, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Eisenhower
Imaging Center / Lucy Curci
Cancer Center, 
Lower Level
39000 Bob Hope Drive
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-674-3850
Interventional Radiology

Mehran K. Elly, M.D., Ph.D.
Eisenhower Health / Eisenhower
Imaging Center / Lucy Curci
Cancer Center, 
Lower Level
39000 Bob Hope Drive
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-674-3850
Interventional Radiology,
Cardiovascular Imaging

John Francis Feller, M.D.
Desert Medical Imaging 74785
Highway 111, Ste. 101
Indian Wells, CA 92210
760-776-8989
Musculoskeletal Imaging,
Orthopaedic Imaging, Body
Imaging, Sports Medicine
Radiology

Brian K. Herman, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Eisenhower
Imaging Center / Lucy Curci
Cancer Center, 
Lower Level
39000 Bob Hope Drive
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-773-1251
Interventional Radiology,
Neuroradiology, Endovascular
Surgery

Marla R. Lander, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ Comprehensive Cancer Center
1180 N. Indian Canyon Drive,
Ste. E150
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-416-4700
Mammography, Breast Imaging

ENDOCRINOLOGY, DIABETES,
& METABOLISM
Elke Jost-Vu, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Eisenhower
Medical Associates
72780 Country Club Drive, B
Bldg., Ste. 205
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-321-5257
Diabetes, Thyroid Disorders,
Pituitary Disorders

FAMILY MEDICINE
Frank B. Arian, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ Eisenhower Health/ Victory
Physicians
490 S. Farrell Drive, Ste. C104
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-327-8755

Christopher J. Faux, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ First California Physician
Partners
35800 Bob Hope Drive, Ste. 225
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-673-7010

Julia Lo Martin, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Eisenhower
Medical Associates / Argyros
Health Center
45280 Seeley Drive, Floor 3
La Quinta, CA 92253
760-610-7300
Concierge Medicine

Gregory A. Pecchia, D.O.
Eisenhower Health / Eisenhower
Medical Associates / Argyros
Health Center
45280 Seeley Drive, Floor 3
La Quinta, CA 92253
760-610-7300

Stephen Ross Steele, D.O.
Eisenhower Health / Eisenhower
Medical Associates / Argyros
Health Center
45280 Seeley Drive, Floor 3
La Quinta, CA 92253
760-610-7300
Primary Care Sports Medicine

David H. Stoltzman, M.D.
Eisenhower Health
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Wright
Bldg., Ste. 409
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-346-0663
Geriatric Medicine

Murray D. Taylor, M.D.
Eisenhower Health
39300 Bob Hope Drive, Bannan
Bldg., Ste. 1105
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-773-3379

GASTROENTEROLOGY
Adewale B. Ajumobi, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Eisenhower
Medical Associates
39700 Bob Hope Drive,
Hirschberg Bldg, Ste. 101
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-773-2882
Endoscopy & Colonoscopy

Gary Annunziata, D.O.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Gastroenterology Consultants
35900 Bob Hope Drive, Ste. 275
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-321-2500

Mehrdad Asgeri, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ Oasis Advanced
Gastroenterology
1100 N. Palm Canyon Drive,
Ste. 214
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-699-7607
Colonoscopy, Inflammatory
Bowel Disease/Crohn’s, Gastric
& Esophageal Disorders

Geoffrey D. Block, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Eisenhower
GI 
Specialty Clinic
39700 Bob Hope Drive, Ste. 101
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-773-2882
Endoscopic Ultrasound, Liver
Disease, Pancreatic & Biliary
Disease,
Colonoscopy/Polypectomy

Anh T. Duong, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Gastroenterology Consultants
35900 Bob Hope Drive, Ste. 275
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-321-2500

GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY
Mark C. Genesen, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Eisenhower
Medical Associates / Mike & Jan
Salta Health Center
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Floor 2
Rancho Mirage CA 92555
760-733-4383
Gynecologic Cancers

Ernest S. Han, M.D., Ph.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ City of Hope National Medical 

Center / Comprehensive Cancer
Center
1180 N. Indian Canyon Drive,
Ste. E218
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-416-4800
Gynecologic Cancers, Robotic
Surgery

HAND SURGERY
Eric L. Freedman, M.D.
John F. Kennedy Memorial
Hospital / Eisenhower Health /
Desert Hand Associates
36951 Cook St., Ste. 102
Palm Desert, CA 92211
760-342-8444
Hand & Upper Extremity
Surgery, Arthritis, Carpal Tunnel
Syndrome

Stephen J. O’Connell, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Orthopedic Center
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Harry &
Diane Rinker Bldg.
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-568-2684
Upper Extremity Surgery, Carpal
Tunnel Syndrome, Rotator Cuff
Surgery

INFECTIOUS DISEASE
Shubha J. Kerkar, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ Eisenhower Health /
Comprehensive 
Cancer Center
1180 N. Indian Canyon Drive,
Ste. E218
Palm Springs, CA 92262 760-
416-4921
HIV/AIDS, Infectious Disease

Bachir K. Younes, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Younes
Medical
36923 Cook St., Ste. 103
Palm Desert, CA 92211
760-636-1336
HIV, Wound Care, Lyme
Disease, Tuberculosis

INTERNAL MEDICINE
Paul A. Biskar, M.D.
Eisenhower Health
41750 Rancho Las Palmas
Drive, Ste. C4
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-346-0600

Mary Ann Howell, M.D.
Eisenhower Health
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Probst
Bldg., Ste. 317
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-340-3611
Concierge Medicine

Hessam Mahdavi, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Eisenhower
Medical Associates / Argyros
Health Center
45280 Seeley Drive, Floor 3
La Quinta, CA 92253
760-610-7220
Integrative Medicine

Mustaqeem A. Qazi, M.D.
82013 Dr. Carreon Blvd., Ste. C
Indio, CA 92201
760-863-0138

John D. Stansell, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Eisenhower
Medical Associates / Eisenhower
Primary Care
4791 E. Palm Canyon Drive,
Ste. 200
Palm Springs, CA 92264
760-834-7950
AIDS/HIV

INTERVENTIONAL
CARDIOLOGY
Andrew D. Frutkin, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Cardiology Consultants
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Hal B.
Wallis Bldg.
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-346-0642
Coronary Artery Disease, Heart
Valve Disease, Cardiac Imaging

Ghassan M. Kazmouz, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ Eisenhower Health / Coachella
Valley Cardiology
1180 N. Indian Canyon Drive,
Ste. W304
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-322-9562
Angioplasty & Stent Placement,
Coronary Artery Disease

Puneet Khanna, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Cardiology Consultants
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Hal B.
Wallis Bldg.
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-346-0642

Khoi Minh Le, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Cardiology Consultants
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Hal B.
Wallis Bldg.
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-346-0642
Cardiac Catheterization,
Angioplasty & Stent Placement,
Peripheral Vascular Disease,
Preventive Cardiologyy

MEDICAL ONCOLOGY
Murthy V. Andavolu, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / John F.
Kennedy Memorial Hospital /
Eisenhower Medical Associates /
Lucy Curci Cancer Center
39000 Bob Hope Drive
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-770-4034
Cancer Genetics, Cancer
Immunotherapy

Elber S. Camacho, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ City of Hope National Medical 

Center / Comprehensive Cancer
Center
1180 N. Indian Canyon Drive,
Ste. E218
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-416-4800
Leukemia, Lymphoma, Multiple
Myeloma

Luke P. Dreisbach, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Hematology-Oncology Medical
Group
39800 Bob Hope Drive, Ste. C
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-568-3613

Philip B. Dreisbach, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Hematology-Oncology Medical
Group
39800 Bob Hope Drive, Ste. C
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-568-3613
Lung Cancer, Breast Cancer,
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin’s,
Ovarian Cancer

Coty P. Ho, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ John F. Kennedy Memorial
Hospital / Comprehensive 

Cancer Center
1180 N. Indian Canyon Drive,
Ste. E218
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-416-4749
Gastrointestinal Cancer, Solid
Tumors

Amy Law, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Hematology-Oncology Medical
Group
39800 Bob Hope Drive, Ste. C
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-568-3613
Head & Neck Cancer, Neuro-
Oncology, Hematology

Maria Iliana Popescu, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Regional Medical Center /
Eisenhower Desert Cancer Care
39000 Bob Hope Drive
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-346-7655

David E. Young, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Hematology-Oncology Medical
Group
39800 Bob Hope Drive, Ste. C
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-568-3613
Hematology

NEPHROLOGY
David M. Alderman, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ Eisenhower Health / Desert
Nephrology
1180 N. Indian Canyon Drive,
Ste. W303
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-416-4819

Rodolfo R. Batarse, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Regional Medical Center /
Desert Kidney Care
71511 Highway 111, Ste. H
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-773-2200

Narendra S. Chandrashekar,M.
D.
Eisenhower Health / 
John F.
Kennedy Memorial Hospital /
Kidney Institute of the Desert /
Coachella Valley Nephrology
43576 Washington St., Ste. 100
La Quinta, CA 92253
760-360-4433

Bryan L. Stone, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ Eisenhower Health / Desert
Nephrology
1180 N. Indian Canyon Drive,
Ste. W303
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-416-4819
Hypertension, Transplant
Medicine-Kidney, Nutrition

NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY
Shahin Etebar, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Regional Medical Center /
Desert Spine & Neurosurgical
Institute
1180 N. Indian Canyon Drive,
Ste. E317
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-346-8058
Spinal Surgery

Farhad Limonadi, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Neurosurgical Associates
72780 Country Club Drive, Ste.
A104
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-837-8020
Brain & Spinal Surgery, Spinal
Surgery—Complex, Brain
Tumors

Alfred Shen, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Neurosurgical Associates
72780 Country Club Drive, Ste.
A104
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-837-8020
Spinal Surgery

Javed Siddiqi, M.D.
Institute of Clinical Orthopedics
& Neuroscience
1180 N. Indian Canyon Drive,
Ste. W214
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-416-4511
Skull Base Surgery, Spinal Cord
Surgery

NEUROLOGY
Antoine J. Elhajjar, M.D.
Desert Neurology & Sleep
41990 Cook St., Ste. A101
Palm Desert, CA 92211
760-340-0528
Sleep Disorders, Headache,
Epilepsy, Movement Disorders

Bhagwan I. Moorjani, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ Hope Neurologic Center
79440 Corporate Center Drive,
Ste. 108
La Quinta, CA 92253
760-514-0166
Pediatric Neurology, Clinical
Neurophysiology, Neurological
Imaging, 
Nerve Injuries

Reza Nazemi, M.D.
Eisenhower Health
39000 Bob Hope Drive,
Kiewit Bldg., Ste. 308
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-341-3400

OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY
Lisa M. Bodon, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ Eisenhower Health / Desert
Valley
OB/GYN
1180 N. Indian Canyon Drive,
Ste. 425 E
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-778-1011
Gynecology only

Karen H. Donley, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Eisenhower
Medical Associates / Women’s
Health at Argyros 
Health Center
45280 Seeley Drive, Floor 3
La Quinta, CA 92253
760-610-7220
Gynecology Only

Christine L. Griswold, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Eisenhower
Medical Associates
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Kiewit
Bldg., Ste. 405
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-568-4343

Les J. Gurwitt, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Regional Medical Center / Fleur
Women’s Health
72780 Country Club Drive, Ste.
A103
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-779-5511
Women’s Health, Gynecology
Only

Enrique G. Jacome, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Regional Medical Center / Fleur
Women’s Health
72780 Country Club Drive, Ste.
A103
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-779-5511
Robotic Hysterectomy, Minimally
Invasive Surgery, Pelvic
Reconstruction

Toni L. Long, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Eisenhower
Medical Associates / Women’s
Health at Argyros Health Center
45280 Seeley Drive, Floor 3
La Quinta, CA 92253
760-610-7220
Gynecology Only, Menopause
Problems, Sexual Dysfunction

OPHTHALMOLOGY
Clifford O. Brown, M.D.
John F. Kennedy Memorial
Hospital / Eisenhower Health
82013 Dr. Carreon Blvd., Ste. H
Indio, CA 92201
760-200-9909
Diabetic Eye
Disease/Retinopathy, Cataract
Surgery, Macular Degeneration

Clement K. Chan, M.D.
Southern California Desert
Retina Consultants
36949 Cook St., Ste. 101
Palm Desert, CA 92211
760-340-2394
Retina/Vitreous Surgery, Retinal
Disorders

Robert B. Guss, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ The Vision Professionals
1180 N. Indian Canyon Drive,
Ste. 130
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-320-7051
Corneal Disease & Surgery

Camille M. Harrison, M.D.
Coachella Valley Retina
72301 Country Club Drive, Ste.
108
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-895-1993
Retina/Vitreous Surgery, Diabetic
Eye Disease/Retinopathy, Macular
Degeneration

Jennifer I. Hui, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / El Centro
Regional Medical Center / The
Eyelid Institute
41990 Cook St., F Bldg., Ste.
1007
Palm Desert, CA 92211
760-610-2677
Oculoplastic & Reconstructive
Surgery, Eyelid
Surgery/Blepharoplasty

Bart P. Ketover, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Milauskas 

Eye Institute
72057 Dinah Shore Drive, Ste. D
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-340-3937
Cataract Surgery, Intraocular
Lens

Steven G. Lin, M.D.
Southern California Desert
Retina Consultants
36949 Cook St., Ste. 101
Palm Desert, CA 92211
760-340-2394
Retina/Vitreous Surgery, Macular
Disease/Degeneration, Retinal
Disorders

Harry Marshak, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Coachella
Valley Retina
74075 El Paseo, Ste. D2
Palm Desert, CA 92260
760-341-2551
Cosmetic Surgery-Face & Eyes,
Eyelid Cosmetic &
Reconstructive Surgery

ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY
James A. Bell, M.D., Ph.D.
Eisenhower Health / 
Desert
Regional Medical Center /
Desert Orthopedic Center
151 S. Sunrise Way, Ste. 500
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-568-2684
Trauma, Sports Medicine, Joint
Replacement

David W. Duffner, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ Eisenhower Health
71511 Highway 111, Ste. A
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-340-2600
Spinal Surgery, Joint
Replacement

David A. Friscia, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Orthopedic Center
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Harry &
Diane Rinker Bldg.
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-568-2684
Foot & Ankle Surgery—
Complex, Ankle Replacement &
Revision, Charcot Foot, Sports
Injuries—Foot & Ankle

Patrick St. Pierre, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Orthopedic Center
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Harry &
Diane Rinker Bldg.
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-568-2684
Arthroscopic Surgery, Shoulder
Arthroscopic Surgery, Shoulder
Surgery, Sports Injuries

A. David Tahernia, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Orthopedic Center
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Harry &
Diane Rinker Bldg.
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-568-2684
Spinal Surgery

OTOLARYNGOLOGY
B. Maya Kato, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ Eisenhower Health / The Ear
Institute
36867 Cook St., Ste. 103
Palm Desert, CA 92211
760-565-3900
Skull Base Surgery, Balance
Disorders, Cochlear Implants

Eric A. Nash, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / La Quinta
ENT
78370 Highway 111, Ste. 160
La Quinta, CA 92253
760-771-4242
Sinus Disorders/Surgery, Voice
Disorders

Qing Tian, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ First California Physician
Partners Otolaryngology
47647 Caleo Bay Drive Ste. 210
La Quinta, CA 92253
760-771-1000
Head & Neck Surgery

Majid Torabi, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Regional Medical Center /
Desert Cities Allergy &
Otolaryngology
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Probst
Bldg., Ste. 202
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-346-1788
Sinus Disorders/Surgery, Allergy

Quinten M. VanderWerf, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert Ear,
Nose & Throat
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Wright
Bldg., Ste. 301
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-340-4566
Facial Plastic & Reconstructive
Surgery, Nasal Surgery

Mark D. Wilson, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert Ear,
Nose & Throat
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Ste.
301, Wright Bldg.
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-340-4566

PAIN MEDICINE
C. Edward Anderson Jr., M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ Desert Pain Care Medicine
Group
36915 Cook St., E Bldg., Ste.
102
Palm Desert, CA 92211
760-969-5200
Pain — Interventional
Techniques

Mark Bouffard IV, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / 
Pain &
Spine Center 
of the Desert
72650 Fred Waring Drive, Ste.
214
Palm Desert, CA 92260
760-776-7999
Pain-Chronic, Pain-
Musculoskeletal, Arthritis

Lee W. Erlendson, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Rancho
Mirage Pain Associates
39300 Bob Hope Drive Bannan
Bldg., Ste. 1203
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-773-3075
Pain Management

Roland D. Reinhart, M.D.
Eisenhower Health
39700 Bob Hope Drive Ste. 202
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-341-2360
Pain Management, 
Pain-Back

PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY
Aijaz Hashmi, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ Loma Linda University Medical
Center
555 E. Tachevah Drive 2W
Bldg., Ste. 105
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-318-8100
Congenital Heart Disease —
Adult, Fetal Echocardiography

PEDIATRICS
M. Nieves Gutierrez-Go, M.D.
Valley Children’s 
Medical Center
80495 Highway 111
Indio, CA 92201
760-347-2887

Alexander A. Villarasa, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ Desert Valley Pediatrics
1801 E. Tahquitz Canyon Way,
Ste. 102
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-327-5900

PHYSICAL MEDICINE &
REHABILITATION
David R. Clawson, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Eisenhower
Medical Associates / Dolores
Hope 
Outpatient Clinic
39000 Bob Hope Drive
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-834-7870
Stroke Rehabilitation,
Musculoskeletal Injuries,
Electrodiagnosis, 
Sports
Medicine

PLASTIC SURGERY
Scott M. Aaronson, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ Eisenhower Health
1221 N. Indian Canyon Drive
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-325-5255
Cosmetic Surgery — Breast,
Facial Rejuvenation, Liposuction
& Body Contouring, Cosmetic
Surgery — Face & Body

Ritu R. Chopra, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Cedars-
Sinai Medical Center / Plastic
Surgery Institute
71949 Highway 111, Ste. 300
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-568-2211
Facelift, Breast Revision, Breast
Reconstruction, Breast
Augmentation

Andrew J. Hayduke, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Regional Medical Center /
Eisenhower Medical Center
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Kiewit
Bldg., Ste. K206
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-341-6996
Cosmetic Surgery — Face,
Breast, Eyelid Surgery,
Liposuction & Body Contouring

Andrew P. Ordon, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Cedars-
Sinai Medical Center / Plastic
Surgery Institute
71949 Highway 111, Ste. 300
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-568-2211
Facelift, Breast Revision, Breast
Reconstruction, Breast
Augmentation

Suzanne M. Quardt, M.D.
Eisenhower Health
70017 Highway 111, Ste. 1
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-324-2660
Cosmetic Surgery — Breast,
Liposuction & Body Contouring

Mark V. Sofonio, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Regional Medical Center
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Kiewit
Bldg., Ste. 407
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-341-5555
Cosmetic Surgery — Face &
Body, Skin Laser Surgery,
Liposuction, Reconstructive
Plastic Surgery

Judith B. Zacher, M.D.
Eisenhower Health
39300 Bob Hope Drive Bannan
Bldg., Ste. 1106
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-340-5774
Breast Cosmetic &
Reconstructive Surgery,
Liposuction & Body Contouring,
Cosmetic Surgery-Face

Mohammed Zakhireh, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / 
Cosmetic
Surgery Institute of Palm Desert
73710 Alessandro Drive, Ste. A1
Palm Desert, CA 92260
760-837-0364
Cosmetic Surgery — Face &
Body, Breast Augmentation,
Liposuction & Body Contouring

PSYCHIATRY
Ihor Galarnyk, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Loma Linda
University Medical Center, East
Campus
41990 Cook St., Ste. 2003
Palm Desert, CA 92211
760-341-8341
Addiction/Substance Abuse,
Geriatric Psychiatry

PULMONARY DISEASE
Ronald E. Sneider, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Regional Medical Center /
Eisenhower Pulmonary & Sleep
Specialty Clinic
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Wright
Bldg., Ste. 201
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-834-3564
Sleep Disorders, Lung Disease

Ziad A. Tannous, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ Eisenhower Health
1180 N. Indian Canyon Drive,
Ste. W208
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-323-4416
Lung Disease, Airway Disorders

Shahriyar Tavakoli, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Eisenhower
Pulmonary & Sleep Specialty
Clinic
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Wright
Bldg., Ste. 201
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-834-3564
Critical Care, Interventional
Pulmonology

RADIATION ONCOLOGY
Peter Greenberg, M.D.
21st Century Oncology
40055 Bob Hope Drive, Ste. B
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-202-3946
Lung Cancer, Gynecologic
Cancers

Judy M. Jackson, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ City of Hope National Medical
Center / Comprehensive Cancer
Center
1180 N. Indian Canyon Drive,
Ste. E218
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-416-4800
Gynecologic Cancers,
Gastrointestinal Cancer,
Prostate Cancer, 
Breast Cancer

Monica M. Khanna, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Eisenhower
Lucy Curci Cancer Center
39000 Bob Hope Drive
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-674-3600

Theodore D. Masek, M.D.
Redlands Community Hospital /
21st Century Oncology
77840 Flora Road
Palm Desert, CA 92211
760-200-8777
Prostate Cancer

REPRODUCTIVE
ENDOCRINOLOGY/INFERTILITY
Maher A. Abdallah, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ Eisenhower Health / American
Reproductive Centers
1199 N. Indian Canyon Drive
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-346-4334
Infertility — IVF, Polycystic
Ovarian Syndrome,
Preimplantation Genetic
Diagnosis

RHEUMATOLOGY
Maria W. Greenwald, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Medical Advances
72855 Fred Waring Drive, Ste.
A6
Palm Desert, CA 92260
760-341-6800
Rheumatoid Arthritis

Kam A. Newman, M.D.
Eisenhower Medical Center /
Eisenhower Medical Associates
Mike & Jan Salta Health Center
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Floor 1
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-837-8569

SURGERY
Ramy A. Awad, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ Eisenhower Health / Desert
Surgical & Bariatric Specialists
555 E. Tachevah Drive, Ste. 2W-
107
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-866-0024
Bariatric/Obesity Surgery

Bobby S. Bhasker-Rao, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Parkview
Community Hospital Medical
Center / Lite Life Surgery
35900 Bob Hope Drive, Ste. 205
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-778-5220
Gastric Bypass Surgery,
Laparoscopic Surgery, Minimally
Invasive Surgery, Hernia

David M. Hyams, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Regional Medical Center /
Desert Surgical Oncology
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Kiewit
Bldg., Ste. 207
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-773-3311
Breast Cancer, Endocrine
Cancers, Gastrointestinal
Cancer, Cancer Surgery

Janet K. Ihde, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ Eisenhower Health/
Comprehensive Cancer Center
1180 N. Indian Canyon Drive,
Ste. E150
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-416-4915
Breast Cancer & Surgery,
Melanoma, Thyroid Cancer &
Surgery

THORACIC & CARDIAC
SURGERY
Eric R. Presser, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
/ FCPP Surgical Associates
1180 N. Indian Canyon Drive,
Ste. E421
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-424-8224
Minimally Invasive Thoracic
Surgery, Lung Cancer, Video
Assisted Thoracic Surgery
(VATS)

Joseph W. Wilson Jr., M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Regional Medical Center /
Cardiothoracic Surgery Clinic
39000 Bob Hope Drive,
Kiewit Bldg., Ste. 108
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-568-4330
Cardiothoracic Surgery,
Minimally Invasive Heart Valve
Surgery, Minimally Invasive
Thoracic Surgery

UROLOGY
John R. Faulkner, M.D.
Eisenhower Health
72780 Country Club Drive, C
Bldg., Ste. 302
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-346-4299
Minimally Invasive Surgery

Jeffrey H. Herz, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Regional Medical Center /
Urologic Institute of the Dessert
39000 Bob Hope Drive,
Kiewit Bldg., Ste. 401
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-346-1882
Prostate Cancer, Pediatric
Urology

Elliot B. Lander, M.D.
Rancho Mirage Medical Center
72780 Country Club Drive, C
Bldg., Ste. 301
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-776-0040
Interstitial Cystitis, Hormonal
Disorders

Gary Leifer, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Walsh
Urology Associates
72057 Highway 111
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-346-7191

Michael A. Sanford, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Eisenhower
Urology Specialty Clinic
39000 Bob Hope Drive, Wright
Bldg., Ste. 412
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-346-8555
Prostate Cancer, Incontinence,
Kidney Cancer, Erectile
Dysfunction

Brad A. Wolfson, M.D.
Desert Regional Medical Center
555 E. Tachevah Drive, Bldg.
2W Ste. 101,
Palm Springs, CA 92262
760-320-6005
Prostate Benign Disease,
Kidney Stones, Prostate Cancer,
Pediatric Urology

VASCULAR SURGERY
Alan E. Williamson, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Eisenhower
Medical Center Department of
Vascular Surgery
39300 Bob Hope Drive, Salta
Bldg., Floor 2
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-837-8601

Son Ha Yu, M.D.
Eisenhower Health / Desert
Regional Medical Center /
Desert Vein & Vascular Institute
71780 San Jacinto Drive, I Bldg.
Rancho Mirage, CA 92270
760-568-3461
Varicose Veins, Endovascular
Surgery, Vein Disorders,
Peripheral Vascular Disease
SAVE THE DATE
Note from Mrs. B
A friend of mine attends these dance classes and advises
that MEN are needed
.
REMEMBER - WE OFFER FREE ADVERTISING TO OUR
SUBSCRIBERS.

WE LOVE TO HEAR YOUR COMMENTS, KUDOS OR
CONDERNS.

GET INVOLVED IN YOUR COMMUNITY

YOUR VOICES NEED TO BE HEARD
CHP - Mojave

Thanks to helpful citizens, it has come to our attention of a tour
bus traveling on US-395 and passing other motorists over
solid double yellow lines. We have reviewed the video and our
investigators are currently taking appropriate actions.

As a reminder, passing or driving over solid double yellow lines
is illegal. California Vehicle Code section 21460 (a) - If double
parallel solid yellow lines are in place, a person driving a
vehicle shall not drive to the left of the lines. (b) If double
parallel solid whites lines are in place, a person driving a
vehicle shall not cross any part of those double solid white
lines. (c) If the double parallel line, one of which is broken, are
in place, a person driving a vehicle shall not drive to the left of
the lines, except as follows: (1) If the driver is on the side of
the roadway in which the broken lines is in place, the driver
may cross over the double lines or drive to the left of the
double lines when overtaking or passing other vehicles.

If you have any questions or concerns, feel free to contact our
office during normal business hours.
Note from Mrs. B

Mario is the guy who mostly keeps the jokes rolling in. We
especially like this one!















A man was walking down the street when he was accosted by a
particularly dirty and shabby-looking homeless man who asked him
for a couple of dollars for dinner.

The man took out his wallet, extracted ten dollars and asked, "If I
give you this money, will you buy some beer with it instead of
dinner?"

"No, I had to stop drinking years ago," the homeless man replied.

"Will you spend this on green fees at a golf course instead of food?"
the man asked.

"Are you NUTS!" replied the homeless man. I haven't played golf in
20 years!"

"Well," said the man, "I'm not going to give you money. Instead, I'm
going to take you home for a hot shower and a terrific dinner cooked
by my wife."

The homeless man was astounded. "Won't your wife be furious with
you for doing that?"

The man replied, "That's okay. It's important for her to see what a
man looks like after he has given up drinking and golf."

Mario Thomas Georgio
Szechwan Shrimp

"Don't let some of the ingredients fool you--this spicy shrimp
makes a simple, impressive dish, which I usually make for
company. For more or less heat, adjust amount of red pepper.
Serve over hot steamed rice."











4 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons ketchup
1 tablespoon soy sauce
2 teaspoons cornstarch
1 teaspoon honey
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1/4 cup sliced green onions
4 cloves garlic, minced

12 ounces cooked shrimp, tails removed

Directions

In a bowl, stir together water, ketchup, soy sauce, cornstarch,
honey, crushed red pepper, and ground ginger. Set aside.

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in green
onions and garlic; cook 30 seconds. Stir in shrimp, and toss to
coat with oil. Stir in sauce. Cook and stir until sauce is bubbly
and thickened.

Serve over steamed rice and enjoy
The Night Pat Garrett (Probably)
Shot Billy the Kid
Lincoln County
By Jay W. Sharp

Billy the Kid











One of only two images acknowledged by experts to be Billy the
Kid. This is a tintype believed to have been taken
in Ft. Sumner in 1879-80. A 3rd photo has been discovered, but
not all experts have acknowledged it yet.

In the summer of 1881, Billy the Kid, hiding out around the hamlet
of Fort Sumner in east-central New Mexico, should have known
that Lincoln County Sheriff Pat Garrett would try to hunt him down
and kill him. The Kid had just broken out of jail in Lincoln, New
Mexico, where he had been sent by a judge and jury in Mesilla,
New Mexico, to hang for murder. He had shot two deputy sheriffs
to death during his escape. He had learned that his notoriety had
spread from coast to coast. He surely understood that Garrett
would not just forget about him.

Billy the Outlaw
Although only 21, The Kid – also known as Henry McCarty, Henry
Antrim or William Bonney, names reflecting the shards of his
fractured family life – had already given a new dimension to the
notion of “outlaw.” He had ridden with several gangs, hustled in
the regional gaming halls, busted his companions out of
imprisonment, stolen horses across the territory, rustled cows in
New Mexico and Texas, fought in the infamous Lincoln County
War, escaped from several jailhouses, gunned down at least four
and possibly as many as ten men, and terrorized people from the
Rio Grande to the Pecos River to the High Plains.

After his escape from jail in Lincoln, Billy the Kid had fled to Fort
Sumner because he had friends there, including many among the
Hispanic people, who – like their Spanish ancestors – admired a
wild spirit and reckless audacity. Billy knew that he could count on
them for a bunk and a meal in their adobe homes and sheep
camps. He could rely on them to keep a secret. He thought that he
could hang around the community until he could put some money
in his pocket and head south for Mexico, beyond the reach of Pat
Garrett, according to Robert M. Utley in his book Billy the Kid: A
Short and Violent Life.

















Ruins of a cabin in White Oaks, New Mexico, where Billy the Kid
lived.

Meanwhile, from newspapers brought to him by his friends, Billy
likely followed the media accounts of his breakout from the Lincoln
jail. Undoubtedly, he realized that he had fired public interest. From
New York to San Francisco, “people waited in fascinated
suspense to learn whether the fearless young killer would remain
at large,” according to Utley. Billy surely knew, too, that the
governor of New Mexico had put a price on his head.

While criminal and murderous instincts lay at his core, Billy also
had a certain raffish charisma, particularly among the Hispanics,
whose language he spoke fluently. He had not only challenged the
authorities, he had scorned danger, mocked death and charmed
local daughters. He starred at village fandangos or bailes, where
he danced to the polkas, waltzes and schottisches performed by
the mariachis playing violins and the traditional convex-back
guitars. He knew that many of the Hispanics thought of him as a
folk hero.
















A contemporary reporter, quoted by Utley, said that Billy, who
stood about five feet and eight inches tall and weighed some 140
pounds, had “clear blue eyes, with a rougish [sic] snap about
them; light hair and complexion. He is, in all, quite a handsome
looking fellow, the only imperfection being two prominent front
teeth slightly protruding like a squirrel’s teeth, and he has
agreeable and winning ways.”

While he moved restlessly around Fort Sumner during that summer
of 1881, Billy must have mused over the chronicle of events that
brought him to a point where he had to think about leaving the
country and heading south.

On a cold and snowy day six months earlier, Billy and his gang had
been run to ground by Pat Garrett and a posse at a small rock
cabin at Stinking Springs, a few miles east of Fort Sumner. Cal
Polk, one of Garrett’s posse, remembered that “...Billy cride [sic]
out is that you Pat out there. Pat says yes, then Billy says Pat why
don’t you come up like a man and give us a fair fite [sic]. Pat said I
don’t aim to. Billy says that is what I thought of you, you old long
legged son of a bitch...” (The quote appeared in the Angelfire
Internet site’s article “Billy the Kid’s Capture at Stinking Springs.)
Billy and his gang soon starved out. They surrendered.

Under guard by Garrett and his men, Billy and the other prisoners
rode by wagon to Las Vegas, New Mexico, where they were met
by a boisterous mob. Billy smiled and waved to the crowd, enjoying
the attention. In jail, Billy was “cheerful and upbeat,” said a
reporter for the Las Vegas Optic, according to the Internet site
“Chronology of the Life of Billy the Kid and the Lincoln County
War, Part 9.”











On December 27, still under guard by Garrett and his men, Billy
and the other prisoners boarded a train. It took them to Santa Fe,
where they spent three months in jail. While he wrote letters from
his cell to the governor of New Mexico, pleading for a pardon, Billy
and his fellow gang members did their best to dig a tunnel to
freedom. After officials discovered the escape attempt, Billy found
himself in solitary, shackled to the floor of a cell as dark as a cave.

Near the end of March, Billy and one other gang member, guarded
by three deputy U. S. Marshals, including an old enemy, Bob
Olinger, boarded a train southward for Mesilla, where they would
face trial. Billy endured tormenting by Olinger throughout the trip.

On April 9, in a one-story adobe building on the southeast corner
of Mesilla’s plaza, Billy stood before the bench, the jury having
found him guilty of gunning down Sheriff William Brady in a
revenge killing in Lincoln three years earlier. On April 13, Billy
heard his sentence: He would be sent to Lincoln, where he would
be hanged.

On April 16, Billy began the trip, by wagon, to Lincoln, under a
seven-man guard, including, again, the hateful Bob Olinger. For
the whole five-day trip, Billy, shackled to the floor of his wagon,
ignored Olinger’s taunts. Once in Lincoln, Billy came once more
under the custody of Pat Garrett, who had him shackled to the
floor of his courthouse cell and placed under the guard of Olinger
and Deputy James W. Bell.

Late in the afternoon 12 days later, Billy watched as Olinger left
the jail with five other prisoners, heading to the hotel across the
street for dinner. Billy asked Bell to take him outside to the privy.
On the way back into the courthouse and his cell, Billy, although
shackled with hand and leg cuffs, bludgeoned Bell with the chains.
He seized the deputy’s pistol, according to Utley. Billy shot the
deputy, leaving him to stagger outside and collapse, dying almost
immediately in the arms of a passerby named Godfrey Gauss.
Though impeded by his shackles, Billy quickly made his way
upstairs. He raided the armory, taking Olinger’s prized double-
barrel shotgun, a brand new firearm. Billy stood at an open second-
story window like a wolf spider waiting for prey. Within moments,
as he anticipated, he saw Olinger pass on the ground below,
rushing back from the hotel to the courthouse to investigate the
gunfire. Godfrey Gauss shouted, “Bob, the Kid has killed Bell.”
Billy looks down on Olinger and said, mockingly, “Hello, Bob.”
Startled, Olinger looked up and saw Billy in the window above. He
said, “Yes, and he’s killed me, too.” And Billy did. He fired both
barrels full into the face and chest of his tormentor, killing him
instantly.

With the help of friends, Billy freed himself from his shackles. He
“borrowed” horses. Over the next two weeks, he drifted south
along the drainage of the Pecos River, northeast across the High
Plains of Texas, then back southwest to his old haunts around Fort
Sumner. Now, he looked south toward Mexico. He thought about
freedom from Sheriff Pat Garrett’s pursuit.

Tracking Down Billy the Kid
Painting of Pat GarrettGarret, who would become a legend in his
own right, thought that Billy would surely head south immediately,
into Mexico, beyond the reach of the law. Without knowing Billy’s
whereabouts, Garrett waited, biding his time. He began to read
newspaper accounts and hear rumors of Billy the Kid “sightings”
from Mexico to Tombstone, Arizona, to Denver, Colorado, to
Austin, Texas. Still Garrett waited, through May, through June, into
July.

Garrett, an ex-buffalo hunter, had drifted into east central New
Mexico in 1878, according to Utley. A lanky young man well over
six feet tall, Garrett had swiftly established a reputation as “a
tough, resolute fellow, quiet and soft-spoken but not to be trifled
with. ‘Coolness, courage, and determination were written on his
face,’ noted one who knew him.” Called “Juan Largo,” or “Big
John,” by the Hispanics, he, like Billy, danced at local fandangos
to the music of the mariachis. He married an Hispanic woman, and
after her premature death, he married another Hispanic woman.
Garrett had friends of his own in the region. He won his office on a
“law and order” platform in the lawless and disorderly Lincoln
County.

Near mid-July, Garrett finally got reliable intelligence on Billy’s
location. His quarry, he learned, had not run immediately for
Mexico, but had holed up somewhere around Fort Sumner. Garrett
got ready to pounce. He enlisted two deputies, John W. Poe and
Tom “Kip” McKinney. They headed for Fort Sumner.

Showdown Time
As both The Kid and Garrett certainly knew, Fort Sumner had been
the setting for memorable chapters in the history of the
Southwestern frontier. During the Civil War, it had served as a
concentration camp for the Navajos and Mescalero Apaches, who
lost many of their people in the insect-infested fields and fetid
waters of the Pecos River valley. It had become the northernmost
point on the Pecos River leg of the Goodnight-Loving Trail, which
Texas cowmen used to drive tens of thousands of longhorn cattle
to markets as far north as Wyoming. After abandonment by the
Army in 1868, the fort – the heart of the community – fell into the
hands of Lucien B. Maxwell, a cattle baron, and at one time, the
largest private landowner in the United States. The former officers’
quarters had been recast as a large and lavish home for the family
and servants, much like a Mexican hacienda. The compound
passed into the hands of son Pete Maxwell when Lucien died in
1875.

Both Billy the Kid and Pat Garrett knew the Maxwell family well.
Neither knew, however, that, by sheer coincidence, they would
converge at the Maxwell place on the warm moonlit night of July
14, 1881.

Around 9:00 p.m., said Utley, Billy lounged on the ground with
friends in a nearby peach orchard, chatting in Spanish. He wore
his customary sombrero, boots, and a dark vest and pants. He
rose from the ground, walked out of the orchard, lept over a fence,
and disappeared into the Maxwell compound. He either went to the
room of a friend (or, possibly, to the room of Celsa Gutierrez, Pat
Garrett’s sister-in-law) along the old officers’ row.

Around 9:00 p. m., Garrett, with Poe and McKinney, appeared in
the peach orchard, planning to talk in secret with Pete Maxwell,
hoping he might know something current about Billy. Garrett and
his men kept to the shadows. They saw men sitting on the ground.
They heard them speaking in Spanish. As they watched quietly,
they saw in the moonlight someone, who wore a sombrero, boots
and dark vest, rise from the ground, walk out of the orchard, leap
over a fence and disappear into the compound.

Pecos River
Near midnight, they moved silently to the southeast corner of the
Maxwell house, just outside Pete’s bedroom. Garrett left Poe and
McKinney on the porch. He entered quietly through the open door
into the darkened bedroom to awaken Pete and question him.

Near midnight, Billy, having taken off his hat, vest and boots,
decided that he wanted something to eat. He built a cook fire. He
took his knife – and, apparently as a precaution, his Colt pistol –
and he walked, in his socks, across the compound to cut a piece of
meat from the carcass of a freshly killed yearling steer hanging
from a rafter above the porch outside Maxwell’s bedroom.

Simultaneously, inside the bedroom, Garrett started to question
Maxwell, who was aggravated about having been awakened.

Just outside the bedroom, on the porch, Billy discovered the
shadowy figures of Poe and McKinney. “Quien es?” Billy
demanded, leveling his pistol on Poe. “Who are you?” He moved
toward the door to Maxwell’s bedroom, probably thinking
instinctively that it would serve as a sanctuary.

Garrett and Maxwell heard the anxious voices on the porch. They
fell silent.

Billy entered the room, his pistol ready. “Who are those fellows
outside, Pete?” he asked Maxwell, according to Utley.

“That’s him!” Maxwell said to Garrett.

Billy, startled, saw the dark form of Garrett. “Quien es?”

“...I jerked my gun and fired,” Garrett would say later, quoted by
Utley.

Afraid that Garrett may have wounded a lion in the darkness,
Garrett and Maxwell scrambled out of the room, which fell silent.

Garrett said, “...I think I have got him.” They heard nothing.

Garrett watched as Maxwell lit a candle and placed it in the
window of the bedroom to light the interior. Garrett, Poe and
McKinney peered through the window, and in the flickering light,
they could see a figure sprawled on the floor, motionless.

Billy the Kid, with Pat Garret’s bullet lodged in his chest, just above
the heart, lay dead. Bereaved Hispanic women gathered at the
sound of the gunfire. They carried The Kid’s body to a nearby
room, laying his body on a bench. They placed “...lighted candles
around it according to their ideas of properly conducting a ‘wake’
for the dead,” said Deputy Poe, as quoted by Utley. The afternoon
of the next day, the community buried Billy the Kid in the Fort
Sumner cemetery, next to two old friends and gang members.

Or was it really Billy the Kid they buried that hot July afternoon?

Now Comes Brushy Bill
In 1949, an aging man called Ollie L. “Brushy Bill” Roberts, who
lived in Hamilton County, Texas, about 100 miles southwest of the
Dallas/Fort Worth area, declared that Pat Garrett had not killed
Billy the Kid that night in Fort Sumner, according to the Angelfire
Internet site. Rather, Brush Bill contended, Garrett had killed
another man, whose name was Billy Barlow. Brushy Bill claimed
that he was the real Billy the Kid. He said that he, in fact, had
escaped and fled Fort Sumner. He said he had lived in Mexico with
the Yaqui Indians until things in the U. S. cooled down, then he
returned to work, he claimed, as a Wild West performer, a law
enforcer, and a mercenary, living under a dozen different aliases.
He said that he served with Pancho Villa in the Mexican
Revolution. He married four times.

Undeniably, Brushy Bill bore certain physical resemblances to Billy
the Kid. He appeared to know an exceptional amount about
Lincoln in 1881, The Kid’s escape from the Lincoln jail, and events
in Fort Sumner. He had old acquaintances who vouched for him.














On the other hand, Brushy Bill never seemed to have explained
why so many people who knew and revered Billy the Kid grieved at
the funeral on July 15, 1881. Brushy Bill’s version of the killing
finds no support in any other contemporary account. His story
sometimes appears to run contrary to known history. Photographs
of Brushy Bill as a young boy do not seem to match up precisely
with the one known photograph of Billy the Kid.

Headstone of Billy the Kid and two friends at Fort Sumner cemetery











Unfortunately, before anyone could resolve the contradictions in
the story, Ollie L. “Brushy Bill” Roberts collapsed and died of a
heart attack in Hico, Texas, on December 27, 1950. The question
of whether Pat Garrett really shot Billy the Kid that night in Pete
Maxwell’s bedroom remains unanswered to this day.

Tracking Down Billy the Kid
You can track Billy the Kid – as a child – from New York City to
Indianapolis, to Wichita, to Denver, to Santa Fe, to southwestern
New Mexico’s Silver City. You can track him – as an outlaw – from
eastern Arizona across New Mexico to the Texas Panhandle.

You will find that Lincoln, essentially a museum frontier village
located in the Bonita River canyon between eastern New Mexico’s
Sacramento and Capitan Mountains, is a good place to start your
quest. A number of the historic sites and buildings from the Billy
the Kid era have been preserved. They are open to visitors. For
additional information, contact:

Visitors Center
Highway 380
Lincoln, New Mexico 88338
Phone: 1-505-653-4025

Fort Sumner, located on the Pecos River about an hour and a half
drive north of Roswell, is a good second stop. At the old military
fort, you will find a marker, showing the location of the Maxwell
house, where Garrett shot Billy the Kid, and you can visit The Kid’s
grave, just south of the Old Fort Sumner Museum.














For additional information, contact:

Fort Sumner Chamber of Commerce
707 North 4th Street
P.O. Box 28
Fort Sumner, New Mexico 88119

Phone: 1-505-355-7705
Fax: 1-505-355-2850
E-mail: info@ftsumnerchamber.com

There are a number of other places where The Kid left his
fingerprints. For instance, he sold stolen cattle, charmed the girls
and played cards in the mining community of White Oak, now an
interesting ghost town with an intriguing cemetery located about a
45-minute drive from Lincoln, in the western end of the Capitan
Mountain range. The Kid hung out around the old mill on the main
street through Ruidoso, about an hour’s drive up into the
Sacramento Mountains from Lincoln. He got involved in a shootout
at Blazer’s Mill near Mescalero, about a 20-minute drive southwest
of Lincoln, on Highway 70. He faced trial, conviction and
sentencing in a building still standing in Mesilla, in the Rio Grande
Valley just west of Las Cruces in south-central New Mexico. He
purportedly busted one of his buddies out of jail in a building still
standing in San Elizario, Texas, in the Rio Grande Valley about 20
miles downstream from El Paso.
Koon/Edwards
Donna:  Thanks for your response….I want you to know that I really
appreciate all the information you provide on the blog….it must take
a great deal of time to write that every week.  We are only at our
place 2-3 weeks,  maybe 3 times a year, but I  have used the vendor
list many times and have always been happy with the
recommendations.

All the general information you provide is very interesting and I enjoy
the jokes, cartoons, etc. as well.  Thank you for your efforts in
keeping the Bermuda Dunes community informed.  Best regards,
Karen

Hi Karen:

Thanks so much for your kind words. We really appreciate it.

And thank you for sending us Ricky's information. We have
posted it in our vendor list.
Rick’s Property Services /  Owner Ricky Smith /  Contact 760 625
9433/RicksPropertyServices.com

He cleaned my garage …power washed the floor/cleaned the
shelf/sorted out items and hauled away small items that I wanted to
get rid of. Also does windows, mirror, skylight and solar panel
cleaning/Full service power washing/on time and pleasant to work
with.

Karen Koon, Lacovia Drive
How to Clean a Cast Iron Pan

Cleaning a cast iron pan is easy! No dishwashers! A clean, well
seasoned creates a rust resistant, nonstick surface. Properly
cared for, this durable skillet will just keep getting better with
age. Here's how to take care of a cast iron skillet.












How to Clean a Cast Iron Frying Pan
To clean, just use mild dish soap (that's right, it's okay to use a
little soap!) and a scouring pad or a cast iron pan cleaning
brush. Wash it, scrub it, rinse it, then wipe it out well and season
it with a few drops of oil and store with a paper towel covering
the cooking surface.

Besides soap and a scrubby, you can also use some really hot
water and a spatula to take off seriously burnt-on food. It’s how
cooks clean flat-top grills in a restaurant, so it’ll work for you, too.

For really baked-on residue, scrape with boiling water
















How to Dry a Cast Iron Pan
It’s cleaned and rinsed, now make sure the rust doesn't come
back. It’s easy: just turn the burner to high, set the pan on it, and
wait for the water to boil out. That cast iron is practically parched
now.

Dry the pan on the stove
















How to Season Cast Iron

Now, it’s clean and dry, but you want it seasoned. “Seasoning”
is, basically, oil bonding to the iron (there’s more to it than that,
but once the scientists say “long-chain polymers” I start looking
out the window and just want some lunch). So, in lieu of a class
on metallurgy, just follow these 2 easy steps:

1. Heat your clean cast iron pan on the stove until it's crazy hot.

2. Pour a little canola oil or flaxseed oil on a wad of paper towel
and rub it all over the pan. Do not touch that hot pan with your
unprotected hand. Then wipe the surface with a clean paper
towel to remove excess oil. You do NOT want a thick slick of oil
on your pan, otherwise you'll end up with a sticky, gummy mess.
Let the pan cool.

Wiping Oil on a Clean Cast Iron Pan
















And that's how to season a cast iron pan! Easy, right? NOTE: If
you've totally stripped down your pan with steel wool and you're
seasoning from scratch, you'll want to repeat these steps a half
dozen times until the pan looks shiny and smooth. But don't be
tempted to slather on the oil to speed up the process; you'll just
end up with a gummy pan. If you're doing routine maintenance
on your pan, one round of seasoning should do it.

Taking Care of Your Cast Iron Pan

If your pan was super rusty, you may want to repeat the
heating/oiling/cooling process, reseasoning the pan 2 or 3 times
before you use it. For more on cleaning rusty cast iron, check out
how to clean a rusty cast iron pan.

What you’ll find is that every time you clean and season cast iron
-- clean it, dry it on the stove, then oil it and cool it -- your pan
will clean easier, become increasingly non-stick, and even get
less prone to any rust appearing on it. It's true, cleaning a
seasoned cast iron pan is easier.

Cast Iron FAQ

So that's how to clean and season a cast iron skillet. Now we
have a few answers to your burning cast-iron care questions

Why is my cast iron pan sticky and gummy?

Using too much oil when you season cast iron will make your
pan sticky. You'll need to wash the pan with soap and hot water
to remove the excess oil, then reseason it using just a thin, thin,
thin coating of oil.

What kind of oil should I use to season my cast iron pan?

Many fans of cast iron cooking swear by flaxseed oil, as it builds
up a smooth, hard finish every time you properly season your
pan. But because flaxseed oil can be very expensive and fragile
(you have to refrigerate it), canola oil is often the next best
choice.

My new pan says it's already seasoned. Do I still have to season
it?

It's a good idea to give your pre-seasoned cast iron pan a little
more protection before you use it for the first time, and always
season it again after you use it.

Can I season my cast iron pan in the oven?

Yes, in fact many people do. Here's how to season cast iron
pans in the oven. First, wash and dry the cast iron pan. Add
vegetable oil to a paper towel and wipe a thin, even coat of oil on
the inside and outside of the pan. Then place the pan upside
down in a preheated 350 degree F oven (lay a sheet of
aluminum foil on the bottom rack to catch any oil drips). Let the
cast iron "bake" for an hour. Then let it cool down. That's also
how to cure a new cast iron pan. After curing cast iron in the
oven, it's ready for routine use.

Can I soak my cast iron pan in water to soften up crusted-on
food before I wash it?

What? No! Never soak your cast iron pan. What you can do is
heat the pan on the stove with water in it and scrape off the bits
with a wooden spatula as it comes to a boil.
Spring Plant Walks Start January 25
Every Friday through March

















Learn about Anza-Borrego Desert State Park’s amazing desert
plants! Meet knowledgeable Botany Society volunteers for a
morning stroll in different locations in the Park. Leaders and
destinations will vary depending on bloom locations. Each walk is
limited to 30 people. Advance registration is required. Call ABF at
760-767-0446 x1002 to sign up. Walks meet at ABF, 587 Palm
Canyon Dr. Suite 111, Borrego Springs, CA 92004.

In the Wild: Earthquakes & Fault Lines

January 25-26
Instructor: Chuck Houser























Most Californians live within 30 miles of an active fault. But what
exactly is an active fault? This class will outline the process used
to locate, evaluate, and characterize faults. Three significant
Southern California earthquakes will be highlighted: M 6.6
Superstition Hills Earthquake of November 24, 1987; M 7.3
Landers Earthquake of June 28, 1992; and M 7.2 Sierra-El Mayor
(Easter Sunday) Earthquake of April 4, 2010. Mr. Houser will also
present some discussion of earthquake magnitude and how some
of these notorious earthquakes compare.

This field trip will cover the general tectonic regime of Southern
California, namely the predominance of right lateral strike slip
faults of the San Andreas system, and less frequent associated
left lateral or normal faults, and how these faults are identified in
the field.  We will visit the Coyote Creek fault in the area of Desert
Gardens north of town and Lute Ridge just east of town. We will
observe several geomorphic features indicating the location of the
fault “in the wild.” These include offset drainages, side-hill
benches, linear valleys, closed depressions, truncated spurs, a
beautifully expressed offset rock bar, and for the sharp eye,
maybe even lines of vegetation.










Please join us for a celebration of photography!
FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Judge Critique of Entries
4 p.m. at the UCI Steele/Burnand Anza-Borrego Desert Research
Center
401 Tilting T Dr, Borrego Springs, CA 92004

Wondering why a certain photo won but yours did not? Wondering
why YOUR photo won? Thinking of entering next year and curious
about the judging process? Join Contest Judge Paul Johnson for
a display and critique of photographs entered in the 2019 contest.
Paul will go through the winning photographs and offer a critique
and judge summary of the contest as a whole. Don't miss out on
this insider view to the contest!

Opening Reception
5:30 p.m. at Borrego Art Institute
665 Palm Canyon Dr, Borrego Springs, CA 92004

Join Anza-Borrego Foundation and Borrego Art Institute as we kick
off the Gallery Show for the 2019 Anza-Borrego Desert Photo
Contest! Peruse the winning photos and honorable mentions, pick
up ribbons if you are a winner, enjoy hors d'oeuvres from our
friends at Kesling's Kitchen, and mingle with your fellow
photographers! Many judges will be present to chat about the
contest and photography, and our friends from George's Camera
in San Diego will be there.

Don't worry! If you miss the Judge Critique and Opening
Reception, the photos will be on display at Borrego Art Institute
until Sunday, February 24, 2019.































$20/$15 for ABF Members
Leader: Diana Lindsay, co-author of the sixth edition of Anza-
Borrego Desert Region

Join us for a Valentine’s weekend getaway to explore the geology
and vegetation of Nude Wash. This moderate two-mile loop has a
challenging set of dry waterfalls to scale. Geologic features
include signs of detachment faulting and fault-sheared and
gouged granitic and metamorphic outcrops. We will climb to a
saddle and then hike down a ridge that overlooks Sunset Wash
and has great views of the Borrego Badlands. Elevation gain is up
to 100 feet. Hops at the end of the hike provided by Burning Beard
Brewery in El Cajon!



















Situated in the northwest corner of El Cajon, Burning Beard is in
the heart of the City’s commercial and industrial core. We serve
not only the hard working men and women of our community, but
all those who seek out and appreciate top quality, expertly crafted
San Diego beer.










Bring: Snacks, lunch, lots of water, sturdy shoes, sun protection,
and whatever else you need to be comfortable in the varying
conditions of a desert winter. Be sure to bring a chair to lounge in
at the end!

Meet: at the Nude Wash turnoff. It is not signed, so we will send
meeting location info to participants when the date gets closer.  

Hikes & Hops and Bikes & Brews with Anza-Borrego Foundation

Good scenery, good beer, good company
Hikes & Hops and Bikes & Brews connect people with two things
in common — a love of Anza-Borrego and craft beer. Hikes &
Hops is a social hike series in Anza-Borrego Desert State Park,
with Bikes & Brews being the same but with mountain and road
bike rides. Join us for a hike and a beer or a bike and a brew!

**This event includes the consumption of alcohol. Families with
children are welcome if they can keep up with the group or be
carried. ABF may request photo ID for any participant who looks
30 and under. Only those over the age of 21 will be allowed to
participate in the “hops” portion of the event. Be responsible when
drinking. Camping in Anza-Borrego Desert State Park is
encouraged and there are several hotels in Borrego Springs. At
the very least, please visit one of our Borrego Partner restaurants
for a good meal before heading home.
Why does my cat follow me around the house all day yet
she doesn't like when I touch her and ignores me?







If a cat considers you a part of her extended family, or her pride,
the cat will follow you everywhere. She will hunt for you, since
you clearly are not catching many of those yummy birds and
mice. Share your food. Sleep with or near you. And if you're very
lucky, allow you unlimited hugs, full body massages including
tummy rubs, and kisses. She will lick you clean ….
warning…sandpaper tongues can hurt tender flesh…but its
worth it.

Cats are all individuals. Some love to be held and petted until
your arm falls off. Some do not like it at all. Could be trust issues
from prior PTSD. Some cats are a little mentally unstable. Just
like some people. And some have a neurological disorder,
hyperesthesia, which can cause pain with over stimulation such
as simple petting.

“Hyperesthesia is the opposite of anesthesia – instead of lack of
sensation, a cat with hyperesthesia appears to have too much
sensation from the skin or muscles under the skin. Like tickling, it
starts out a bit pleasant but rapidly becomes painful or
distressing to the cat.”

Hyperesthesia | Grafton, WI | Best Friends Veterinary Center

If you don't have a snuggly kitty, but have the companionship of
a cat or a whole pride ( we have 10 in our 4 adult household…
with 6 dogs and 2 birds) . Then be satisfied with that
relationship. It could be worse….catless!!
How to Cook Frozen Chicken
Your Easy, No-Fuss Guide

For safety reasons, storing uncooked chicken in the freezer is a
good idea. Freezing chicken slows down the reproductive cycle
of dangerous bacteria like salmonella (though it doesn't kill
them), and helps ensure your dinner is safe.




























On the other hand, freezing your chicken generally means
having to defrost it, and you've got to do that properly, or risk
letting those salmonella bacteria run rampant.


Another option is to cook the chicken from frozen. Yes, it's
possible! The biggest challenge is making sure it's cooked all the
way through. Besides the fact that undercooked chicken can be
a safety hazard leading to food poisoning, it's also no fun to eat.

Indeed, frozen chicken is arguably safer to handle than fresh or
thawed chicken, because it won't drip salmonella juice all over
you or your kitchen counter.

Below we describe our two recommended methods for cooking
frozen chicken: simmering and in the oven.

Forget the Slow-Cooker
But let's get one thing out of the way before we go any further.
The food safety experts at the U.S. Department of Agriculture
advise not to cook frozen chicken in a slow cooker.


The reason: Slow cookers are designed to cook at a low
temperature, and the slow-cooker might not get hot enough to
heat frozen chicken all the way to 165 F, which is the minimum
temperature for a chicken to fully cook, as well as to destroy any
dangerous bacteria. That, or it might take too long to reach 165
F, giving bacteria a chance to multiply.


Moreover, the USDA does not distinguish between new slow-
cookers, old ones, middle-aged ones, or any other designation,
including so-called "hot cooking" slow cookers or what have you.
A slow-cooker is a slow-cooker, and from a food-safety
standpoint, none of them are appropriate for cooking frozen
chicken.

Which Methods Are Okay?
It is safe to cook frozen chicken in the oven or on the stovetop,
however. That includes whole chickens as well as any smaller
portions thereof—boneless or bone-in.

And by stovetop, we mean simmering. Adding a frozen item to a
pan of hot fat is a dangerous thing to do, as water will make the
hot oil spit out at you and can cause burns, or more serious
issues. So don't try to sauté a frozen chicken breast.

Grilling frozen chicken, on the other hand, is not a good method
as the high temperature of a grill will cause the outside of the
chicken to burn by the time the frozen interior is anywhere near
cooked.

Allow 50 Percent Additional Cooking Time
So what does that leave? Essentially, simmering and roasting (or
baking). The general guideline you need to know is that it will
take around 50 percent longer than if you're starting with a
chicken that is fully thawed.

Thus, if a 5-pound chicken would normally take 1 1/2 hours to
roast, a frozen one would take at least 2 hours and 15 minutes.

However, because of the extended cooking time, it's not a bad
idea to cook it at a slightly lower temperature, so if a recipe calls
for a 400 F oven, cook it at 375 F instead. If you do this, you're
probably looking at double the cooking time vs. 1 1/2 times.

But don't go lower than 350 F.

Simmering Frozen Chicken
You could also cook frozen boneless chicken breasts by
simmering them in your favorite jarred or homemade sauce.
Again, allow 50 percent additional cooking time. For frozen
boneless chicken breasts, cover and simmer for about 30
minutes, but check for doneness either with an instant-read
thermometer or by slicing (there should be no pink).

For frozen bone-in chicken thighs, drumsticks or whole leg
pieces, plan on simmering for about 90 minutes. The advantage
with dark meat sections is that when the meat falls off the bone,
it's done.

Cooking Frozen Chicken Breasts in the Oven
For this technique, if you are preparing multiple frozen breasts,
they must be separate, not frozen together in a single slab.

Preheat oven to 350 F.
Arrange the breasts in a single layer on a sheet pan.
Brush the breasts with olive oil, mustard, yogurt or melted butter,
and season with Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper.
Optional: top with a mixture of seasoned breadcrumbs and
grated Parmesan.
Bake for 30 to 45 minutes or until their interior temperature
reaches 165 F.
Roasting a Whole Frozen Chicken
This technique will work for a smallish (4-pounds) whole frozen
chicken.

Preheat oven to 350 F.
Position the chicken breast-side up on in a roasting pan with a
rack. IF YOU CAN: Remove the bag of giblets, and stuff the
cavity with sliced lemon, fresh herbs, aromatic veggies, etc. If the
bird is too frozen, do this later.
Brush the bird with olive oil, and season with Kosher salt and
freshly ground black pepper. Roast uncovered for 90 minutes.
You should be able, after about 1 hour, to remove the giblets
and add your herbs and aromatics (but don't repeatedly open the
oven to check).
Increase oven temperature to 450 F and cook another 15 to 30
minutes, or until the skin is browned and the temperature in the
deepest part of the thigh registers at least 165 F on an instant-
read thermometer (although 175 F at the thigh is better).
Rest the bird for 15 to 20 minutes, then carve and serve.
Hi Donna

I had a disturbing encounter recently with a couple who had left
their 2 dogs in their car at Bevmo. It was about 72 degrees, and  
I sat and watched, monitoring the time and fortunately they
returned before the car had a chance to get dangerously hot for
the dogs. When I attempted to explain to them what can happen  
they became incredibly abusive .

I thought it would be a good idea to explain the laws of the both  
the Greenhouse Effect and the state of California to people.
Anyone  that is traveling around with their dogs probably loves
them very much and has no idea the harm that can come to them
even in this sort of  cooler weather.

The law in California allows anybody that sees this to rescue the
dogs by any means necessary, which can mean at the very
least, broken windows.

California - Cal. Penal Code § 597.7

West's Ann.Cal.Civ.Code § 43.100 (eff. 1/1/17)

An animal

Leave or confine an animal in any unattended motor vehicle
under conditions that endanger the health or well-being of an
animal due to heat, cold, lack of adequate ventilation, or lack of
food or water, or other circumstances that could reasonably be
expected to cause suffering, disability, or death to the animal.

First conviction: fine not exceeding $100 per animal.

If the animal suffers great bodily injury, a fine not exceeding
$500, imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding 6 months, or
by both.

Any subsequent violation of this section, regardless of injury to
the animal, punishable by a fine not exceeding $500,
imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding six months, or by
both.

Peace officer, firefighter, humane officer, animal control officer,
or other emergency responder:

A peace officer, firefighter, humane officer, animal control officer,
or other emergency responder is authorized to take all steps that
are reasonably necessary for the removal of an animal from a
motor vehicle.

Must leave written notice bearing his or her name and office, and
the address of the location where the animal can be claimed.

Any person:

In 2016, changes were made to the law that allow any person to
take reasonable steps necessary to remove an animal from a
motor vehicle if the person holds a reasonable belief that the
animal's safety is in immediate danger from heat, cold, lack of
adequate ventilation, lack of food or water, or other
circumstances that could reasonably be expected to cause
suffering, disability, or death to the animal.

This person will not be criminally liable for actions taken
reasonably and in good faith if the person does all of the
following:
·        determines the vehicle is locked or there is otherwise no
reasonable manner for the animal to be removed from the vehicle
·        has a good faith belief that forcible entry into the vehicle is
necessary because the animal is in imminent danger of suffering
harm
·        contacted a local law enforcement agency, the fire
department, animal control, or 911 prior to forcible entry
·        remains with the animal in a safe location, but close by
until emergency responders arrive
·        used no more force than necessary to enter the vehicle
and remove the animal
·        immediately turns the animal over to a representative from
law enforcement, animal control, or another emergency
responder
Immunity for civil liability
A new law (§ 43.100) effective on Jan. 1, 2017 states that there
is no civil liability for property damage to a motor vehicle if the
damage was caused by a person rescuing an animal under
Section 597.7 of the Penal Code.

I hope this information will prevent needless suffering!

regards,
Jenel C McNaughtan
79162 Starlight Lane
BDCC

WANTED

I'm looking to purchase a used treadmill.    

Thank you. Pam

760-408-4809
Students are invited to predict when Mojave Maxine will make her
2019 debut!
If you haven't done so already, make your prediction today!

The east coast has Punxsutawney Phil and Groundhog Day to let
them know when they can expect spring. California has Mojave
Maxine, the desert tortoise, to signify that warmer weather is on the
way.

Students in grades K-12 throughout Southern California have the
opportunity to predict when the desert tortoise will rouse from her
brumation (hibernation for reptiles) and make her first appearance
of 2019, letting us know that spring has arrived!

The first entry received from each county that is closest to the
exact day and time of Mojave Maxine's first emergence will win fun
prizes for their entire class!

The contest is currently open and will continue until Mojave Maxine
emerges from her burrow. Be sure to watch the LIVE camera feed
to see if Mojave Maxine has awoken.
LIVE CAMERA FEED













CLICK HERE     
FOR JANUARY HAPPENINGS AT THE ZOO
After an exciting Opening Day of Sunday Polo presented by Ketel
One Botanical we continue our Sunday Polo events each and
every Sunday through March 24.

Guests can once again enjoy Sunday Polo from the comfort of the
Clubhouse Restaurant with a full service a la carte menu and bar.
Polo fans can also enjoy a great family day out with tailgate
picnics, a bouncy house for the kids and the SOFIA Halftime Divot
Stomp for the adults! NFL Playoffs will be on TV screens in the
courtyard bar area and enter for your chance to win a cruise
courtesy of CruiseOne Palm Desert and Royal Caribbean Cruises.

Entry is just $10 per car with an additional $10 per person
reservation fee for guests that wish to enjoy the comfort of the
Clubhouse. Please remember to get your Clubhouse reservations
in by calling the reservation hotline at (760) 831 POLO  
CLICK HERE for more information.

Continue the fun at the Cantina with the Sunday Polo After Party,
rub shoulders with the players and enjoy the great new Cantina
menu, fully stocked bar and live band playing into the night.

Sunday Polo continues each weekend through March 24 - located
at 50950 Madison St Indio CA  between Ave 50 & 52
www.eldoradopoloclub.com
We are invited to this event at Mission Hills Country Club on
February 2nd.

They are located on Dinah Shore between Davall and Bob Hope
Drive in Rancho Mirage.

Best regards,

Byron

Hello to our Neighbors and Friends

Yeah!! We got through another year without a
Major Earthquake. But, are you ready, in case we have one
tomorrow?

You can join Mission Hills Emergency Task Force at our Expo in
the Grove at Mission Hills Country Club. It is across from the
Fitness Center and we will have Signs.  

Join us  on February 2 at 2:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. to hear the DJ,
enjoy free food and free drinks and learn more about being ready
for a Disaster. After the California Fires a disaster is truly a reality.
We will have Vendors showing and selling Emergency equipment
and Fire Dept and Police Dept. Also a chance to buy and taste
Freeze Dried food

Please RSVP at Mission Hills Member Services at 760-324-9400.
Any questions please feel free to call me
Claudia Fausett  760-321-1509
Our thanks to Barbara Black for these great golf  jokes.

Mrs. B


Eighteen holes of match play will teach you more about your foe
than 18 years of dealing with him across a desk.
-- Grantland Rice

2.  Golf appeals to the idiot in us and the child.  Just how childlike
golf players become. This is proven by their frequent inability to
count past five.
-- John Updike

3.  It is almost impossible to remember how tragic a place the world
is when one is playing golf.
-- Robert Lynd

4.  If profanity had any influence on the flight of the ball, the game
of golf would be played far better than it is.
-- Horace G. Hutchinson

5.  They say golf is like life, but don't believe them.  Golf is more
complicated than that.
-- Gardner Dickinson

6.  If a lot of people gripped a knife and fork as poorly as they do a
golf club, they'd starve to death.
-- Sam Snead

7.  Golf is a day spent in a round of strenuous idleness.
-- William Wordsworth

8.  If you drink, don't drive.  Don't even putt.
-- Dean Martin

9.  If you are going to throw a club, it is important to throw it ahead
of you, down the fairway, so you don't have to waste energy going
back to pick it up.
-- Tommy Bolt

10.  Man blames fate for all other accidents, but feels personally
responsible when he makes a hole-in-one.
-- Bishop Sheen

11.  I don't say my golf game is bad, but if I grew tomatoes they'd
come up sliced.
-- Arnold Palmer

12.  My handicap?  Woods and irons.
-- Chris Codiroli

13.  The ardent golfer would play Mount Everest if somebody
would put a flag stick on top.
-- Pete Dye

14.  I'm hitting the woods just great; but having a terrible time
getting out of them!
-- Buddy Hackett

15.  The only time my prayers are never answered is playing golf.
-- Billy Graham

16.  If you think it's hard to meet new people, try picking up the
wrong golf ball.
-- Jack Lemmon

17.  It's good sportsmanship to not pick up lost golf balls while they
are still rolling.
-- Mark Twain

18.  Don't play too much golf.  Two rounds a day are plenty.
-- Harry Vardon
Lighten up your home (literally) with some great ceiling flood lights.
These are universal LED|BR30 floods. There're low wattage
super bright floods that will last forever - okay, not forever, but
roughly 23 years, which is 'forever' in my book.

And, for the detail conscience:

* A 'set' is 6 of these bulbs as pictured.










* They're a bright 850 lumens and use a low 11 watts. (You're
standard floods use about 65 watts to work.)

* They're dimmable or non-dimmable as needed.

* The savings listed is $149 per bulb over its lifetime.

(10 would save nearly $1,500 - enough pedigreed puppy.)

* Quality 'Sunco' brand in the 'warm white' rating.

* A comparable set of 6 at Costco will run you about $30 plus tax
and all, but these are offered as a steal for $25 per 6 pack, AND I'll
even pay the tax! WAG, right?

(I've got four sets of six and will sell them all for $95.)

Guaranteed that you'll love the results and even be able to see the
small print on the morning crossword !

Steve or Nadine Elliott

sellnell@aol.com 760-899-7441
Of all the animals, man is the only one that lies.

Mark Twain
2019 ANZA BORREGO DESERT - WILDFLOWER REPORTS

Jan 14, 2019 DesertUSA reports: Light rain fell last week and
more rain is forecast for the next three days. There are some
wildflowers in bloom in remote areas. This rain should improve
things for more parts of the park. Some flash floods are possible.
It looks like it will be good year for wildflowers at this point in time.

Here's what Anza Borrego DSP is predicting.

Anza-Borrego Desert State Park 2018-19 “Season” Bloom
Analysis and Prediction
by Kate Harper
Desert Research Botanist
Rain Analysis Related to Blooming

We appear to be heading into a 2-pulse 2018-19 “Season”.

What has triggered the first pulse of blooming?

We had significant rain in spotty areas of Anza-Borrego Desert
State Park (the Park) on October 12, 2018. It was still hot in the
Park, but it was cooling off from the peak summer heat. It
appears that the temperature was still warm enough to trigger the
germination of some monsoonal plants (summer storm triggering
plants), and just cooled down enough to trigger the germination
of some “spring” plants (calendar winter, but what we call in the
desert spring).

So, right now, in mid-January 2019, we are having the beginning
of a bloom! BUT, just in the spotty areas that received the
thunderstorm rain on October 12, 2019. Unfortunately, none of
the popular close-to-town flower field areas are included in this
spotty early bloom.

What has triggered the second, more common pulse of blooming?

The Park received 0.39 inch of rain in a November 29-30, 2018
storm. This is not enough rain to trigger widespread germination,
BUT it is enough rain to soften the dry surface of the soil and to
make the soil receptive to additional rain without run off. And, so
what do you want after such a preparatory rain? A storm of at
least 1 inch. And, the Park got it! A storm event on December 5-
6, 2018 delivered 1.05 inches of rain. Now we have enough rain
to trigger widespread germination of “Spring” annuals.

Think of the desert in the “Spring” like you would think about
planting a garden. After you have the seeds in, all experts
suggest “give your garden a good soaking”. That is the
December 5-6, 2018 storm that delivered 1.05 inches. Then,
what do the garden experts tell you? They say, “Water at regular
intervals.” And, voila! The skies have delivered just such a
watering regime, so far: A semi-soaking on December 31, 2018
of 0.52 inch. A nice interval watering on January 6, 2019 of 0.11
inch. And, right on cue, another interval watering of 0.14 inch on
January 12, 2019!

So, does this guarantee us a lovely “Spring” Bloom this year?
Almost.

Only 2 kinds of events could derail a lovely “Spring” bloom this
year: multiple days of below freezing temperatures or multiple
days of super hot temperatures. Either of these could impact the
plants. BUT, barring those events, we are ON for a lovely year to
be in the flower-filled Borrego Desert!


























2018 ANZA BORREGO DESERT - WILDFLOWER REPORTS
Dec. 26, 2018 DesertUSA reports: There are reports of some
wildflowers in the Borrego Badlands in Big Wash. A 4X4 is
needed to get to them, north of S22. There are some wildflowers
in June Wash off of S2. It's still early and more rain is needed in
the area.

Dec. 19, 2018 Steve reports: Desert lilies and chicory seen
December 18 along S22 near mile marker 34-35. Anza Borrego
DSP.














Dec. 14, 2018 DesertUSA reports: There are some wildflowers
along RT 78 in the Ocotillo Wells area and also along S22 near
the Arroyo Salado camping area. Henderson Canyon Road and
Coyote Canyon are still brown and there's not much to see yet.
Water is running near the Lower Willows, and though part of the
Canyon is still closed, the first part of the road is in good
condition. The Visitors Center is charging $10.00 for parking on
the weekends and on holidays. Monday through Thursday
parking is free. Coyote Canyon from the Lower Willows to the
Middle Willows is closed due to flooding. No access beyond the
first crossing is authorized. Plan your trip with our Anza-Borrego
Desert State Park Introduction Package.

RT 78 area
















ec. 6, 2018 DesertUSA reports: Rain in many area of the Anza
Borrego Desert State Park today. A few wildflowers are blooming
along creeks, in 4wheel drive areas.

Dec. 3, 2018 DesertUSA reports: There are few wildflowers in
bloom in remote places, most of the area remains brown. Rain is
in the forecast for late next week. Some rain on 11/29/18, and
there also was some rain in October in the Kanebrake area and
there are reports of some green in the area. Fish Creek also got
some rain. Coyote Canyon from Lower Willows to Middle Willows
is closed due to flooding. No access beyond first crossing is
authorized.













Wildflower field guide ebook
find the wildflowers by color - Kindle, iPads and Smart phones.
$4.99












When will the desert wildflowers bloom? We start our report in
January, plan your visit to coincide with the peak of the bloom -
keep up to date with DesertUSA's Wildflower Reports. Be sure to
bookmark this page for weekly updates.