How do I send you info to list on the blog. I have some things to sell
and don't know how to do it.  Can't find how to do it on the blog.

Thanks,

Catherine Petrek
206 498 8914

Hello Catherine:

You simply send me photos along with a description and price of
sale items and please include a contact number.

Donna
CRAFTS CLASS
Ladies' Locker Room

Wednesday
9:30 AM

Everyone is invited to participate
What a great way to meet new ladies

























Jewelry Making and Repair
Holiday Decorations
And much more...

Contact: Donna Nelson
dhateasystreet@msn.com
COUNTY
INFORMATION:

Bermuda Dunes
Community Council
Meets the 2nd Thursday
every other month

Supervisor PEREZ office
Esmeralda Perez
760 863 8211
Esperez@rivco.org

Sheriff's Department
Lt. Michael Bianco
760 836 1600
mbianco@riversidesheriff.org

California Highway Patrol
Officer Hector Gutierrez
760 772 5300
HeGutierrez@chp.ca.gov

Cal Fire
Div Chief Ty Davis
760 393 3450
Tyrell.Davis@fire.ca.gov

Code Enforcement
760-393-3344 supervisor
Perez phone number

Bermuda Dunes
Community
Center/Desert Rec
Nicole Fisher
760 564 9921
nfisher@drd.us.com
760-347-3484 ext. 134

Bermuda Dunes Airport





79880 Avenue 42,
Bermuda
Dunes, CA 92203 ·
PH: (760) 345-2558
AGoodwyn@
BermudaDuesAirport.org

Myoma Water Co
Mark Meeler
General Manager
79050 Avenue 42
Bermuda Dunes, CA 92203
760-772-1967  Office
760-345-9761  FAX

GRAFFITI HOTLINE
Desert
1-866-732-1444

All other areas of the
County
1-951-955-3333

Riverside County Waste
Resources

Waste Management has a
roadside cleanup program
in the Riverside County
they can be reached at
951-955-6899

Union Pacific RR
Critical Need Phone #
888 877 7267

ILLEGAL DUMPING
1 393 3344 NOT
Updated:  Sunday, January 11, 2020
“The principal purpose of this website is to provide useful information for residents of Bermuda Dunes.  It is not possible, however, for The Blog Folks independently to verify information submitted to us.  
Accordingly, our listing of goods and services is not intended to be, nor should it be construed as, an endorsement.  The purchasers of goods and services listed on our website are encouraged to perform
their own due diligence.”
This website is owned, operated and paid for exclusively by The Blogfolks. We are not affiliated with Riverside County or any other entity.

LIFE IS GOOD IN BERMUDA DUNES
Card Games, Mexican Train, Samba and
Bridge and Bocce Ball

Are also offered at the Club












Gin Gals















Mexican Train Gals
















Bridge Gals

My Tuesday Morning group plays ACBL bridge. We play
9:00 to approximately noon, the cost is $3.00 . This group is
for women with a basic knowledge of conventions.

On Thursday afternoons, we have a more relaxed group
playing from 2:00 to approximately 4:30. Discussion of play
is permitted to help players of all abilities to improve their
knowledge of conventions.

We welcome new players!

Contact:
Nancy Coates
smokey1dog@twc.com
















Samba Gals

We have sign up on boards for Monday and Friday 11:00
in the Ladies' Lounge
USEFUL INFO
ABOUT BDSA AND
BDCA
Board Members
Bermuda Dunes Security
Association

Robert Nagels, President
Donald Keprta, Vice President
Chris Hogan, Treasurer
Robert Anderson, Secretary
Donald G. Clarke
Joseph R. “Jack” Fox
Jerry Lugo
Martin C. (Duke) Frey
Sylvia Chernick Baran

BDSA Meeting
4th Thurs. of every
month

BDSA BULLETIN
CLICK
HERE

BDSA
Responsibilities
:

Bermuda Dunes Security
Association (BDSA) is
responsible for streets
(potholes, cracks, street
drainage and dry wells),
Security entry/exit, patrol
vehicles, cable TV
agreement, fee collection
& payment, gates & gate
lights, medians, walls,
guardhouses and all
street/gate signage.

BDSA is managed by
Desert Resort Mgmt
Contact:
John Walters-Clark
760 346 1161

BDSA RULES AND REGS

The Admin Office is open
Monday thru Friday for
questions and concerns.

Resident Login System
is handled by DRM

Admin hours are as follows:

Monday 9 -5
Tuesday 9 - 5
Wednesday 9 - 5
Thursday10-6  
Friday 9 - 5
Saturday Closed         
Sunday Closed

If this is urgent, please
contact Security at:

Telephone Numbers:

Main Gate: 760-360-1322
Main Gate #1
Glass Gate #2
Administration #3

Bermuda Dunes
Home Owner's
Association
Meets
Third Tuesday at
6:00 p.m. each month

EXCEPT AUGUST
Adm Bldg
4:30 PM

Charlie Bishop, President
Kristy Hilton, Vice President
Janet McMurtrey, Secretary
Barbara Black, Treasurer
Robert Nagels, Director

BDCA is managed by
Desert Resort Mgmt
Contact:
John Walters-Clark
760 346 1161

CC&Rs for BDSA

Here is what
BDCA is
responsible for:

Bermuda Dunes
Community Association
(BDCA) is responsible for
most problems relating to
property owner's home
and lot, dogs,
landscaping, pool
draining, trash cans,
fountains and landscaping
at the main gate.

The Architectural
Committee reports to the
Community Board

Dues are $100 per year
and are payable in
January in lump sum

Architectural Committee
responsibilities

A.  THE MISSION:  As
representatives of each
Homeowner, members of the
Architectural Control Committee
(ACC), are volunteer community
members.  The ACC, as
established in the CC&R’s, has
been charged with the mission to
oversee that each lot and dwelling
within the Community is developed
and maintained in a manner
compatible with its standard
aesthetics and quality.

B.  ALL IMPROVEMENTS:  The
ACC has the responsibility to
approve or to reject all plans for
real property improvements on all
lots within any subdivision of the
Community, and all properties
owned by the Bermuda Dunes
Community Association and
Bermuda Dunes Security
Association, prior to
commencement of construction of
that improvement.

C. RESPONSIBILITY: The ACC’s
goal is to foster careful design in
furtherance of its responsibility to
represent each Homeowner in the
preservation of the architectural
and landscaping aesthetics and
character of the homes within the
Community and to monitor,
according to its authority for
interpretation, enforcement of
BDCA’s governing documents.  
Utilizing and interpreting the
Guidelines, the ACC will consider
the aesthetic and functional
aspects of each design, including
placement of buildings,
landscaping, exterior finishes and
materials, height and bulk,
orientation of site lines, etc.  In
addition, the ACC will consider the
effect of the proposed
improvement on neighboring
properties and the Community as a
whole.

D.  LIMITATION OF
RESPONSIBILITY:  The ACC is not
responsible for reviewing nor shall
its approval of any plan or design
be deemed approval of any
structural safety or conformance
with building or other codes. The
ACC assumes no responsibility for
the structural or mechanical
soundness of approved designs.

E.  RECORDS:  Records of ACC
approvals or actions will be kept on
file, by Tract or Unit and by Lot
number, at the office of the BDCA.

F.  AUTHORITY:  Submissions are
required directly from homeowners,
regardless that they may reside in
sub-communities that may have
their own architectural review
boards, guidelines and
committees.  The BDCA-ACC has
final authority for approval of
projects as outlined herein. No
submittals will be accepted from
sub-community boards or
committees, unless submission is
for common area projects within
the sub-community.

THE LIVING
DESERT






To see lots and lots of fun activities

CLICK THE LIVING DESERT
FOR JANUARY HAPPENINGS AT THE ZOO

THE BLOGFOLKS CONTACT INFORMATION
Email us: dhateasystreet@msn.com
BERMUDA DUNES
SECURITY ASSOCIATION

CLICK
HERE
FERAL CAT AND KITTY
INFO

REMEMBER...IF YOU ARE
FEEDING FERAL CATS YOU
ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR
THEM










CHECK OUT OUR
'PET PLACE' FOR
ADDITIOAL INFORMATIO
N

LOST MY DOGGIEFUL
BERMUDA DUNES
COUNTRY
CLUB

CLICK
HERE
Have you logged into TownSQ yet?
https://app.townsq.io/login
Register Now to access your account information, create work orders, and get community updates all at your fingertips.
The Blogfolks








Donna and Bob Nelson

This Blog and Website was
created 16 years ago to help
the community of Bermuda
Dunes keep informed of
important issues in our
neighborhood.
We don't profess to know
everything, but we try to get you
accurate information for your
concerns and comments!

We also offer FREE
advertising and For Sale Items

We have a recommended
list of Vendors and
EARTHQUAKE
PREPAREDNESS INFO

If anyone would like to be
on our subscription list, just
let us know.

Email us:
dhateasystreet@msn.com
Have a lovely day!
We SUPPORT the purchase of this property...and
hope you will too!
HERE'S WHAT'S HAPPENING AT THE
BERMUDA DUNES COUNTRY CLUB
COMMENTS FROM COMMUNITY AND FRIENDS
COMMENTS
        Reminder                         

It's not to late to get your ballot back to BDCA
concerning the potential purchase of Lot 1 Bermuda
Dunes Drive.  This purchase requires your vote.  The
acquisition of this property would become a valuable
asset to the community and long range planning for
future development of our own Community Center.

If you have misplaced your ballot a new one can be
obtained by contacting Erin Grossman at Associa
760-346-1161

YOUR BALLOTS NEED TO BE IN ERIN'S
HANDS BY JANUARY 30. 2020
Hello Donna:

You used to post all of Murph's Restaurant's info on your blog. I
have not seen anything for many months. What's up?

Sandra Snyder

Hi Sandra:

As you may or may not know, I have owned two
successful restaurants.

The number one priority (to me) is cleanliness, food safety
and great customer service.  Unfortunately last year I
turned Murph's into the health department because I
knew he was not keeping on top of things.

When I got the report back from the Health Department, I
made up my mind that I would not support Josh. To say
the least, we are not on the best of terms.

In my opinion, Josh was very irresponsible to allow so
many health infractions to occur.
Donna:

I just wanted to thank you for the opportunity to be of service to
the homeowners at Bermuda Dunes Country Club.  The
donation drive went very well.  A gentleman wanted to donate
his 4 grand kids but we had no place to store them so we
declined, other than that all items were accepted as offered.

We did get asked when we were coming back as they needed
more time to clean out closets, etc.  so please let me know
when you would like us to come back.  Most communities do a
second drive right before Easter as those who are fortunate
enough to travel for the summer clean house prior to leaving.

thanks again...

Sincerely,

Shelly Lee, Donations Acquisitions Manager

ANGEL VIEW RESALE STORES - ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE

Hi Shelly:

I like your item of returning around Easter.

Thank you so much for coming to Bermuda Dunes.

Donna


Addendum:

Just got word that Angel View will be at our Club around
Easter. I will post the exact date soon.
Hi Donna and Bob

Received the info from BDSA regarding a 10% increase. What gives?

I think this is quite a lot in one whack.

Gordy

Hello Gordy:

They can actually raise the BDSA dues up to 20% if they need
to. As they said the increase is due to the need for additional
funding for roads within the gates of Bermuda Dunes.

We are okay with the raise.
Attend a Free Park Event


















From campfire talks to bird walks, Anza-Borrego Desert State Park
offers a wide variety of free programs for park visitors. If you will be
exploring the Park anytime this month, take a look at the monthly event
schedule and plan ahead to attend! Be sure to bring the kids along for
Family Hikes and Junior Ranger activities.

See January Details
Why do cats want to be near me but don't want to sit or cuddle
with me? Am I doing something wrong?

I feel for you, I really do. I used to think the same. But I can tell you,
you're not doing anything wrong!

Some cats are simply not lap cats, but they will follow you around the
house for example, or - as yours does - lie close when lounging or
sleeping (a cat that sleeps near you says that you're his hooman. He'll
trust you with his life basically since they're at their most vulnerable
when sleeping).

If you're relatively new to one another things could still change, and if
you're someone who shows affection by touch I can really understand
it'll be a disappointment at first, but if your furbaby does any of these
things he or she will love you just as much, they just don't like to be
picked up or lie on your lap:

Signs of love:

He'll great you with a head butt or body touching your legs when
you've been gone.

He'll follow you around.

He likes to be petted and might even ask for it - and purrs up a storm
when you comply.

He winks at you or blinks with both eyes; the slow blink is a cat-kiss or
cat-I love you according to many a behaviourist.

He'll lie close to you on the couch.

He'll sleep in your bedroom or even on your bed.

These are the most important things. Bufddy does only a few things of
these and not even every day, but he had a stressful start here and I
hope that with time he might come around and at least start greeting
me and marking me with scent too, and sleep in the bedroom every
night.

The fact he's cat 2 in the house might also be of influence though.

I did nothing wrong though and I am sure neither did you. There's only
one tip I could give you and that is basically to train her to come closer.

Play with her a lot, it's bonding. Feed separate meals, cats are very
food motivated and some even like it to be petted while they eat (if she
moves away or tries to shrug you off immediately stop!).

If she's long haired brushing her is always a good thing. Some breeds
don't necessarily need it, but it'll always help them ingest less hair
while grooming and keep your furniture a little cleaner. But if your cat
likes this she could relax into it. If you move her closer and closer to
your lap while brushing the link between nice and lap is made.

Black Cat aka Cakes, my first, is not very social either. I might add,
they are both feral cats.

If you have treats in the house you could use those... However…I need
to warn you that many of the things I described are often used with
scared cats. Cats who might be lap pets but just don't dare. So if she
doesn't go for it after all that, consider this: you tried. It's just not in her
nature. But she does trust and love you or she wouldn't lie so close
(and maybe do those other things). Never force her into things you
want and she doesn't like or you'll lose what you do have.
Wanted Single Family Home or Condo in
Bermuda Dunes







Minimum of 2200 sq ft.

Minimum 3 Bedroom

Minimum 31/2 Baths

Important that there are no steps inside home.

Recreational area to face the north or east.

Prefer Maintain View.

Closing can be quickly if necessary.  Cash Purchase.

Please contact my wife, Donna at 920-819-2349 or email
donnamae9650@gmail.com
I'm combining two houses into one and have so much
to sell--furniture, artwork, etc.
Click link above

Jean Kinda














sectional sofa--down--$250
Coffee Table with 4 nesting stools--$100
Contact Jean Kinda (760) 221-4660

Queen bed--oak  bedroom furniture consisting of a 9 drawer dresser, a
3 drawer dresser and a matching bedside chest (3 drawer.  Stacking
shelves that go atop dressers (2)$400 for all OBO
3 drawer console table, walnut.21" x 59" long, 29" high--$70
Indian artwork including 2 very large desert watercolor landscapes
framed in gold
2 signed R. C. Gorman framed  lilthographs ($500-$600 each  pending
appraisal.

Walnut end table with tray--$15















Chinese Alter Table
Appraised $2400
$1200 OBO
8’ x 20”








Desert landscape
Original price $2800
$1000 OBO
There are two by same artist
M King Prine

TOO MANY ITEMS TO SHOW HERE. CALL AND I CAN SHOW YOU
WHAT I HAVE AVAILABLE.

Jean Kinda (760) 221-4660
Climb Aboard The (Canna)Bus

After being maligned, slandered, and libeled for 90 years,
cannabis has finally cleared its name. For those still wary,
there's the CannaBus, an informational tour of all things
cannabis, ready to change your mind.

Tour participants gather to hear the manufacturing end of
cannabis during a Cannabus Express Tour.









PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY CANNABUS EXPRESS TOURS

Prior to its criminalization in the 1930s, cannabis was pretty
much hunky-dory around the world. Used for material, ropes,
food, and medicinals for at least 10,000 years, historians also
believe the first American flag was crafted from it and, in 1914,
the $10 bill was not only made from cannabis, the back
features farmers plowing hemp. So what happened?

There were conspiracy theories that involve William Randolph
Hearst, the newspaper tycoon, protecting his acreages of forest
for wood-pulp paper making; and that DuPont Industries were
anti-cannabis to protect its new synthetic fabric, nylon, but
those have been debunked. Sure, Hearst ran anti-cannabis
campaigns in his papers, but it was yellow journalism, not
forestry concerns.

Although legal in California, for some, cannabis still has a
negative perception. Ninety years of misinformation would likely
take a long time to reverse. That’s where Lynne Daniels,
creator and owner of CannaBus, comes in. She wants to dispel
all those old tales, and give you the real skinny on the miracles
of cannabis with a unique tour of the valley’s cannabis industry.

Born and raised in Baltimore, Daniels is pretty, petite, talkative,
and a chip off the old block. “My dad was a real go-getter,” she
says. “He said to me, ‘You see that right there on the table?’”
There was nothing on the table, so Daniels wasn’t sure where
he was going until he continued. “‘Just look. See what you
want to see. Then go figure out how to get it because it’s not
coming to you,’” she recalls.










Daniels applied that lesson when she wanted to go to
Hollywood. She asked her parents for a plane ticket, but they
only offered to buy her the return. She needed some fast cash.
Thanks to a bumper sticker, a radio promotion, and ingenuity,
she racked up the money pretty quickly. “It was a $100 cash
giveaway,” she recalls. She slapped a bumper sticker on her
car, blasted her radio, and nabbed the money by strategically
pulling in front of the radio station’s car (which she had
identified at the mall) once it was on the highway. They called
out her license plate. She then solicited her friends to get a
bumper sticker, follow the routine in their cars, and split the
cash with her.

A journalist major with a minor in criminology, Daniels went to
Washington, D.C. after college and got a job at The
Washington Post and helped cover the shooting of President
Reagan in 1981.

A tropical storm during a trip to Acapulco veered her course yet
again. She had become friendly with the hotel manager who
confided that his publicist had quit, just before an upcoming
event. Daniels offered her services, was given the job, and
soon had her first client for her new travel public relations
business.

She eventually opened offices in Houston, New York, and Los
Angeles. She eventually got her own shingle at Warner Bros,
and was living her best life in Malibu, when something awful
happened. She was attacked and mauled by two Dobermans.

In the year it took to recover, she realized she had never
achieved one of her goals: to marry and raise a family. She put
it on the table, envisioned it, and met and married Rob Daniels.













Lynne Daniels and her husband Rob.

Rob came with additional blessings, a 3-year-old son, and the
Dupont Estate in La Quinta. Daniels reinvented herself again
but this time as a mother, and the caretaker of the 8,500 square
foot estate.

Sixteen years later, a small decked-out limo/bus stopped in
front of their Malibu home, and tourists started taking pictures.
Daniels was curious why, so she took the tour and realized
they were misidentifying the residences (including hers) as
celebrities’ homes. It got her wheels turning; she grew
increasingly interested in a tour bus of her own, but one that
offered facts.

The idea for the CannaBus came after two things happened.
First, she learned her mom’s heart medication had side effects.
She had heard that CBD (the medicinal component in
cannabis) might help. It did. The second, her dog tore her ACL,
and the vet said it would require surgery and three-to-six
months recovery time. “I thought, ‘there’s got to be another
way,’” she recalls. “My husband had a shoulder problem, and
was using a topical CBD product that helped. I thought, why
not? I rubbed it on her knee for two weeks and she was back
on the beach again playing. No surgery. I became a believer. I
thought, ‘how can I do something to help out? What can I do?’”

She calls the highly educational CannaBus tour “the root to the
toot” or a play on the industry’s “seed to sale” nomenclature.
Every tour on the CannaBus is different, depending on the
riders and site availability. “We’ve had nurses come on the
tour. We had four pharmacists come in from New York who
wanted to transition over into cannabis because they believed
in it,” Daniels relates. “And when they listened to the mad
scientist, the chemist, and the distilate makers (all experts at
stops on the CannaBus tour), and saw what was going on, it
was no longer that thug industry. It is a medical, medicinal
world that is helping people.”

cannabis












Daniels’ desire to help people doesn’t stop as an adjunct
educator and tour guide in the cannabis world; each month the
CannaBus donates 15 percent of their profits to a charity,
usually in line with the Health Awareness Campaigns, but she
also donates on a local level.

Included on the tour are cultivation houses, labs, manufacturing
sites, distribution companies, bakeries, and dispensaries, all
exclusive to Daniels’ tour which, depending on the day, can
take you from Indio to Desert Hot Springs, and every option in
between. “We have a wheel when you get in,” she explains,
“Spin the wheel and you either get another tour for a gift for
somebody for free or you get a complimentary edible. You spin
the wheel and you get different things. You get 25, 50 percent
off.” Keep in mind, you can’t consume cannabis on the bus, but
she does stop at cannabis lounges where you can partake of
your purchases.

If you’re canna-curious but don’t know how to navigate this
slightly confusing world, or even the difference between CBD
and THC, this “three-hour tour” is just the ticket to expand your
mind. In addition to the cushy ride that more-than-comfortably
seats 10, there is a fun informational video. Educators answer
questions at every stop, and Daniels’ delightful ability to chat
anyone up makes it a good time.

For more information, visit cannabusexpresstours.com.
Are two dogs better than one?

Originally Answered: Why is it better to have two dogs?

I have two dogs and I can definitely recommend getting a second if you
only have one. The first dog was male and often liked to wander,
however when I got a female pup from a local rescue home the male
dog changed from a wanderer to a much better behaved dog.

The two of them get on very well, play together and sleep together, the
female is spayed so there’s no chance of her having pups. All in all I
can honestly say that two dogs are less trouble than one.
Good Evening Bermuda Dunes

We were so happy to have a couple of
weeks off. How were your holidays?

We had an over abundance of parties to
attend and want to thank all of our
friends for the invites.

We have lots to discuss, so let's just
get started.
Mike Bilici
furnitureshowroomca@gmail.com
perezdatepalm@gmail.com

FURNITURE MATTRESS CA

Furniture Upholstry

Sunbrella Fabric Available

760 534 5212
77622 Country Club Drive
Suite J
Palm Desert CA 92211
Dear Donna and Bob

I would like to recommend Mike Bilici's company for anyone needing upholstry
done. He did a couch for us and also just completed our golf cart.

His prices are reasonable and he is very dependable...and GOOD.

Paul Lobo

Hi Paul:

Thanks for this recommendation. He has been added to our List. Click
on the list, then click on "U" for upholstry.
special shout to Ted our good friend for continuing to send us
fun stuff

here are a few below
ANIMAL CORNER
UPDATES IN RED


Bermuda Dunes Community Council Agenda
6:00 p.m. Thursday, January 9, 2020
Bermuda Dunes Community Center
78-400 Avenue 42, Bermuda Dunes, CA 92203

I. Pledge of Allegiance
II. Roll Call
III. Approval of the Minutes – Nov. 7, 2019
IV. Councilmember Reports and Comments
V. Staff Reports: Presenters must direct their report to the council. At
the conclusion of the presentation, Chair may allow questions. Each
speaker must first be recognized by the Chair.

1. Office of Supervisor V. Manuel Perez – Esmeralda Perez,
760-863-8211, Esperez@rivco.org

Traffic Signal on 42 and Adams, Bids in Mid-November, Construction
Spring 2020

b. Storage Facility: owner is working on sign permit, TLMA is working
on extension of water main,landscape is forthcoming and last to be
installed. Jeff is interested in whether there is room to add plants
along the signage at medium

c. Graffiti the Developer will place plants / vines on walls to deter graffiti

d. Hopewell Avenue Project - still in process, has not gone to Planning
Commission still in Entitlements.

Community Cleanup scheduled 2/2/2020, Burrtec will have
special drop off at the event. Large items left in the
neighborhood, you can call Burrtec or Code Enforcement

2. Sheriff’s Department – Lt. Andy Martinez, 760-836-1600,
aamartin@riversidesheriff.org

3. CAL Fire – Division Chief Ty Davis, 760-393-3450, Tyrell.
Davis@fire.ca.gov

4. CHP – Officer Hector Gutierrez, 760-772-5300,
HeGutierrez@chp.ca.gov

5. Code Enforcement –
760-393-3344 supervisor phone number.
Brenda has retired. Use phone number above

6. Desert Recreation District – Nicole Fisher, 760-564-9921,
nfisher@drd.us.com

Nichol gave report

7. Bermuda Dunes Airport – Angel Medina, 760-345-2558,
amedina@bermudadunesairport.org

Lots of exciting things happening - will send flyer to me

8. Desert Christian Academy – Tyler Jacobus, 760-345-2848,
Tjacobus@desertchristianacademy.org

Will be working with Desert Recreation to provide movies for
our community

9. Other Departments/Agencies

VI. New Business: Presenters must direct their report to the
council. At the conclusion of the presentation, Chair may allow
questions. Each speaker must first be recognized by the Chair.

1. Presentation on the 2020 Census & Riverside County’s
Census efforts (information only)
Doug Hassett, Partnership Specialist, U.S. Census Bureau,
douglas.d.hassett@2020census.gov
Shayra Hernandez, 2020 Census Liaison for Supervisor V.
Manuel Perez, shhernandez@rivco.org

VII. Public comments: All persons wishing to address the
Council on items not specifically on the agenda or on matters of
general interest should do so at this time. Please limit your
remarks to 3 minutes.

VIII. Agenda Items for next meeting

IX. Adjourn meeting

2020 meeting schedule: Jan 9, Mar 12, May 7, Sept 10, Nov 12
(Additional meetings may be added if needed). Please visit
Supervisor Perez’s Web site to access more information:
www.RivCo4.org
If you would like to get agendas and other important meeting
information for the Bermuda Dunes Community Council,
please send your email address to Esmeralda Perez at
Esperez@rivco.org
.
Jacob Alvarez
Chair
jacobalvarez@outlook.com
Donna Hubenthal
Member
dhateasystreet@msn.com
Michael Pierson
Vice-Chair
mpierson@dmiwcw.com
Jeff Wattenbarger
Member
jeff@wattenbargerconst.com
Leslie Locken
Secretary
leslielocken@gmail.com
For additional info and purchase tickets, click HERE
51 THINGS TO DO IN PALM SPINGS IN JANUARY!










AKC ALL-BREED DOG SHOWS AND OBEDIENCE AND
RALLY TRIALS / JAN. 2-5

“Coming and winning at the Kennel Club of Palm Springs is
really considered a prestigious win,” says Trish Williamson,
assistant show chair for the annual canine competition at the
Empire Polo Club in Indio. Part of the reason for that clout is
the show’s sheer size: “We’re usually the biggest show west of
the Mississippi,” Williamson explains. Last year’s attendance
count clocked in at 12,000 people, and the affair has an
economic impact of about $2 million.

Williamson and her fellow Kennel Club members spend the
entire year preparing for around 11,000 dogs to trot their way
past the judges’ booths. Spectators can see specialty, breed-
specific, and all-breed conformation trials (in which judges
determine which dogs most closely meet the top standards of
their breeds). There’s also obedience trials and rally courses —
plus some special attractions. “In one of the rings, we’ll have
the four- to six-month-old puppies,” Williamson boasts. “It’s
their first real taste of showing. You can see right away, in
some cases, the stars of the future in that puppy class.”

Though she’s spent the last 13 years on the administrative end,
Williamson also knows what life is like inside the pen. She and
her standard poodles once competed in agility and
conformation trials here in the desert. “It’s a lot of hard work,”
she says. “But it’s very rewarding in the long run. And I feel I
always learn something in working with my dogs.”

Click
HERE for all 51 things to do in January
Sponsored by Esser Air Conditioning
Presented by PS Resorts & City of Palm Springs
Animal Samaritans & 22nd Annual Tour de Palm Springs are
teaming up for the "Walk/Ride of the Year"
Saturday February 8th, 2020
Downtown Palm Springs

Sign up www.tourdepalmsprings.com
& enter code ASCV20

Code ensures 100% signup fee goes to our organization
Must register before January 31st, 2020
Code is valid ONLY in the Coachella Valley

The best charity Walk/Ride of the year!
•You receive a free Tour de Palm Springs T-shirt, magnet &
wristband (first 8,000 participants)
•You are sent off by a nearly 200-member marching band at the
start line
•You walk thru military, police & fire vehicles, and many
American flags at the start
•You are greeted by 100 cheerleaders and a 40 to 50-piece
band at finish line
•You are entertained by a 40-member middle school band
including snacks at rest stop
•1,500 volunteers will pour their hearts out to give participants a
time to remember

Thank you to all who voted for Animal Samaritans as best non-
profit for 2020!

Animal Samaritans
760.343.3477
animalsamaritans.org
monicasquiltandbead.com located at 77780 Country Club
Drive, Suite C-D, Palm Desert, CA 92211.

.
Tumco - Hedges - Ogilby
California Gold Mines and Historical Towns








Driving Interstate 8 east of El Centro, California, after you pass
through the Imperial Sand Hills, you can see off to the left a
small group of mountains that appear dark brown. These
mountains are known as the Cargo Muchacho Mountains. The
mines in the Cargo Muchachos have been called the most
hazardous in the Southwest. Cave-ins and fires were common.
The miners, especially in the summer, found living conditions
deplorable. The town where the miners and their families lived
was originally known as Ogilby and Hedges, then later
changed to Tumco. Because of the old mining activity, access
to the area has been somewhat restricted.

The Cargo Muchacho Mountains have an interesting future, as
well as a checkered past. Today the price of gold is around
$1,200.00 per ounce. Mining operations no longer tunnel down
1,000 feet or more. Now, they just remove chunks of the
mountain, crush the ore and recover the gold.











One of the last remaining buildings

Discovery of gold in the Cargo Muchacho Mining District is
credited to a mule that strayed while members of a
California-bound wagon train were camped near these
mountains in 1862. When the mule was later found in the
foothills, one sharp-eyed man picked up a nugget at the spot. A
few pieces of float were found, which were traced to quartz
ledges.



Over the years, there were several mines operating in the area
of Hedges. The American Girl Mine produced a good deal of
gold and is now the main site of the current gold mining activity.
The Gold Rock Claims passed through many hands but made
little money, and most of the operators eventually went broke.
The Gold Rock Mine closed in the fall of 1881 when the mill
contract terminated. The mines remained closed until 1889
when a Boston firm purchased the claims. The new owners
decided to move the 15-stamp mill they had been using at
another mine to their new claim.

Some of the Gold Rock claims assayed as high as $150 a ton.
(At $20 an ounce that would be about 7.5 ounces of gold a ton,
a very rich find. Today, a mining company will mine as low as
1/8 ounce per ton of ore.) No one was immediately eager to
begin developing the veins because a 14-mile haul was needed
to get the ore to the nearest mill. A group of California investors
decided to gamble on the Gold Rock mines in 1893 and formed
the Golden Cross Mining and Milling Company.



Looking for gold, some copper on the rocks
The Golden Cross Company was soon facing financial
difficulties because the ore didn't bring the high yield expected,
and they couldn't turn a profit operating the 40-stamp mill they
had built. Management concluded that a simple solution would
be to add another 60 stamps. But with a 100-stamp mill
capacity, the problems became worse. It was necessary to
mine some very poor ore to keep all 100 stamps going, and the
firm went further into debt. Even with gold mining, the basic
rules of business still apply -- in order to make a profit, you
have to sell your product at a price higher then it costs to
produce it. This gold operation was finally sold to a Salt Lake
City investment group which gave one million dollars for the
property and agreed to pay the debts owed by the Golden
Cross Company.

It didn't take long for the investors to realize they had made a
bad deal. Ore from the Gold Rock mines was bringing no better
than $3.10 a ton, and financial disaster was soon staring them
in the face. In an effort to stave off the inevitable, the firm
began cyaniding the thousands of tons of tailings that had
accumulated around the mines over the years. Within two years
they were insolvent, and a receiver was appointed to run the
mines. By 1909, the Gold Rock mines had been deserted, and
Hedges became a ghost town.



But there were still some optimistic folks who thought the Gold
Rock claims could be operated at a profit and The United
Mines Company took them over in 1910. Though all of the old
shafts went down at least a 1,000 feet, they reconditioned the
mill and hired a crew. The camp was rechristened Tumco, an
acronym for the company name. But low-grade ore brought the
enterprise to a halt soon after it was launched.





Today, this open area is managed by the Bureau of Land
Management (BLM). All that remains are a few old buildings in
poor shape and some very dangerous mine shafts that drop a
1,000 feet or more. The locals tell a story about a man trying to
jump one of the shafts with his dirt bike; they say he didn't
make it. Others have tried to climb into the shafts with ropes,
only to be overcome by gas rising from the mines and fall to
their deaths. There is still some gold in the washes near town,
but it's not worth the effort it would take to recover it.



I used a dry washer in the area about 16 years ago and got a
few flakes of gold, but it took four hours of digging to get about
$5.00 worth of gold.



If you use a bigger shovel you can dig a hole like this, and yes,
there is water in the desert.



If you're in the area, be sure to stop at the Gold Rock Ranch.
They have a campground, supplies and lots of local history.
The area behind the old town site is now being strip-mined, and
there is some thought of tunneling down to much lower levels to
reach the gold deposits. Let's hope they have better luck than
those mining adventurers of days gone by.

-- Jim Bremner



How to Get There
Tumco - Hedges - Ogilby
California Gold Mines and Historical Towns








Driving Interstate 8 east of El Centro, California, after you pass
through the Imperial Sand Hills, you can see off to the left a
small group of mountains that appear dark brown. These
mountains are known as the Cargo Muchacho Mountains. The
mines in the Cargo Muchachos have been called the most
hazardous in the Southwest. Cave-ins and fires were common.
The miners, especially in the summer, found living conditions
deplorable. The town where the miners and their families lived
was originally known as Ogilby and Hedges, then later
changed to Tumco. Because of the old mining activity, access
to the area has been somewhat restricted.

The Cargo Muchacho Mountains have an interesting future, as
well as a checkered past. Today the price of gold is around
$1,200.00 per ounce. Mining operations no longer tunnel down
1,000 feet or more. Now, they just remove chunks of the
mountain, crush the ore and recover the gold.











One of the last remaining buildings

Discovery of gold in the Cargo Muchacho Mining District is
credited to a mule that strayed while members of a
California-bound wagon train were camped near these
mountains in 1862. When the mule was later found in the
foothills, one sharp-eyed man picked up a nugget at the spot. A
few pieces of float were found, which were traced to quartz
ledges.



Over the years, there were several mines operating in the area
of Hedges. The American Girl Mine produced a good deal of
gold and is now the main site of the current gold mining activity.
The Gold Rock Claims passed through many hands but made
little money, and most of the operators eventually went broke.
The Gold Rock Mine closed in the fall of 1881 when the mill
contract terminated. The mines remained closed until 1889
when a Boston firm purchased the claims. The new owners
decided to move the 15-stamp mill they had been using at
another mine to their new claim.

Some of the Gold Rock claims assayed as high as $150 a ton.
(At $20 an ounce that would be about 7.5 ounces of gold a ton,
a very rich find. Today, a mining company will mine as low as
1/8 ounce per ton of ore.) No one was immediately eager to
begin developing the veins because a 14-mile haul was needed
to get the ore to the nearest mill. A group of California investors
decided to gamble on the Gold Rock mines in 1893 and formed
the Golden Cross Mining and Milling Company.



Looking for gold, some copper on the rocks
The Golden Cross Company was soon facing financial
difficulties because the ore didn't bring the high yield expected,
and they couldn't turn a profit operating the 40-stamp mill they
had built. Management concluded that a simple solution would
be to add another 60 stamps. But with a 100-stamp mill
capacity, the problems became worse. It was necessary to
mine some very poor ore to keep all 100 stamps going, and the
firm went further into debt. Even with gold mining, the basic
rules of business still apply -- in order to make a profit, you
have to sell your product at a price higher then it costs to
produce it. This gold operation was finally sold to a Salt Lake
City investment group which gave one million dollars for the
property and agreed to pay the debts owed by the Golden
Cross Company.

It didn't take long for the investors to realize they had made a
bad deal. Ore from the Gold Rock mines was bringing no better
than $3.10 a ton, and financial disaster was soon staring them
in the face. In an effort to stave off the inevitable, the firm
began cyaniding the thousands of tons of tailings that had
accumulated around the mines over the years. Within two years
they were insolvent, and a receiver was appointed to run the
mines. By 1909, the Gold Rock mines had been deserted, and
Hedges became a ghost town.



But there were still some optimistic folks who thought the Gold
Rock claims could be operated at a profit and The United
Mines Company took them over in 1910. Though all of the old
shafts went down at least a 1,000 feet, they reconditioned the
mill and hired a crew. The camp was rechristened Tumco, an
acronym for the company name. But low-grade ore brought the
enterprise to a halt soon after it was launched.





Today, this open area is managed by the Bureau of Land
Management (BLM). All that remains are a few old buildings in
poor shape and some very dangerous mine shafts that drop a
1,000 feet or more. The locals tell a story about a man trying to
jump one of the shafts with his dirt bike; they say he didn't
make it. Others have tried to climb into the shafts with ropes,
only to be overcome by gas rising from the mines and fall to
their deaths. There is still some gold in the washes near town,
but it's not worth the effort it would take to recover it.



I used a dry washer in the area about 16 years ago and got a
few flakes of gold, but it took four hours of digging to get about
$5.00 worth of gold.



If you use a bigger shovel you can dig a hole like this, and yes,
there is water in the desert.



If you're in the area, be sure to stop at the Gold Rock Ranch.
They have a campground, supplies and lots of local history.
The area behind the old town site is now being strip-mined, and
there is some thought of tunneling down to much lower levels to
reach the gold deposits. Let's hope they have better luck than
those mining adventurers of days gone by.

-- Jim Bremner



How to Get There
Tumco - Hedges - Ogilby
California Gold Mines and Historical Towns








Driving Interstate 8 east of El Centro, California, after you pass
through the Imperial Sand Hills, you can see off to the left a
small group of mountains that appear dark brown. These
mountains are known as the Cargo Muchacho Mountains. The
mines in the Cargo Muchachos have been called the most
hazardous in the Southwest. Cave-ins and fires were common.
The miners, especially in the summer, found living conditions
deplorable. The town where the miners and their families lived
was originally known as Ogilby and Hedges, then later
changed to Tumco. Because of the old mining activity, access
to the area has been somewhat restricted.

The Cargo Muchacho Mountains have an interesting future, as
well as a checkered past. Today the price of gold is around
$1,200.00 per ounce. Mining operations no longer tunnel down
1,000 feet or more. Now, they just remove chunks of the
mountain, crush the ore and recover the gold.











One of the last remaining buildings

Discovery of gold in the Cargo Muchacho Mining District is
credited to a mule that strayed while members of a
California-bound wagon train were camped near these
mountains in 1862. When the mule was later found in the
foothills, one sharp-eyed man picked up a nugget at the spot. A
few pieces of float were found, which were traced to quartz
ledges.



Over the years, there were several mines operating in the area
of Hedges. The American Girl Mine produced a good deal of
gold and is now the main site of the current gold mining activity.
The Gold Rock Claims passed through many hands but made
little money, and most of the operators eventually went broke.
The Gold Rock Mine closed in the fall of 1881 when the mill
contract terminated. The mines remained closed until 1889
when a Boston firm purchased the claims. The new owners
decided to move the 15-stamp mill they had been using at
another mine to their new claim.

Some of the Gold Rock claims assayed as high as $150 a ton.
(At $20 an ounce that would be about 7.5 ounces of gold a ton,
a very rich find. Today, a mining company will mine as low as
1/8 ounce per ton of ore.) No one was immediately eager to
begin developing the veins because a 14-mile haul was needed
to get the ore to the nearest mill. A group of California investors
decided to gamble on the Gold Rock mines in 1893 and formed
the Golden Cross Mining and Milling Company.



Looking for gold, some copper on the rocks
The Golden Cross Company was soon facing financial
difficulties because the ore didn't bring the high yield expected,
and they couldn't turn a profit operating the 40-stamp mill they
had built. Management concluded that a simple solution would
be to add another 60 stamps. But with a 100-stamp mill
capacity, the problems became worse. It was necessary to
mine some very poor ore to keep all 100 stamps going, and the
firm went further into debt. Even with gold mining, the basic
rules of business still apply -- in order to make a profit, you
have to sell your product at a price higher then it costs to
produce it. This gold operation was finally sold to a Salt Lake
City investment group which gave one million dollars for the
property and agreed to pay the debts owed by the Golden
Cross Company.

It didn't take long for the investors to realize they had made a
bad deal. Ore from the Gold Rock mines was bringing no better
than $3.10 a ton, and financial disaster was soon staring them
in the face. In an effort to stave off the inevitable, the firm
began cyaniding the thousands of tons of tailings that had
accumulated around the mines over the years. Within two years
they were insolvent, and a receiver was appointed to run the
mines. By 1909, the Gold Rock mines had been deserted, and
Hedges became a ghost town.



But there were still some optimistic folks who thought the Gold
Rock claims could be operated at a profit and The United
Mines Company took them over in 1910. Though all of the old
shafts went down at least a 1,000 feet, they reconditioned the
mill and hired a crew. The camp was rechristened Tumco, an
acronym for the company name. But low-grade ore brought the
enterprise to a halt soon after it was launched.





Today, this open area is managed by the Bureau of Land
Management (BLM). All that remains are a few old buildings in
poor shape and some very dangerous mine shafts that drop a
1,000 feet or more. The locals tell a story about a man trying to
jump one of the shafts with his dirt bike; they say he didn't
make it. Others have tried to climb into the shafts with ropes,
only to be overcome by gas rising from the mines and fall to
their deaths. There is still some gold in the washes near town,
but it's not worth the effort it would take to recover it.



I used a dry washer in the area about 16 years ago and got a
few flakes of gold, but it took four hours of digging to get about
$5.00 worth of gold.



If you use a bigger shovel you can dig a hole like this, and yes,
there is water in the desert.



If you're in the area, be sure to stop at the Gold Rock Ranch.
They have a campground, supplies and lots of local history.
The area behind the old town site is now being strip-mined, and
there is some thought of tunneling down to much lower levels to
reach the gold deposits. Let's hope they have better luck than
those mining adventurers of days gone by.

-- Jim Bremner



How to Get There
Tumco - Hedges - Ogilby
California Gold Mines and Historical Towns








Driving Interstate 8 east of El Centro, California, after you pass
through the Imperial Sand Hills, you can see off to the left a
small group of mountains that appear dark brown. These
mountains are known as the Cargo Muchacho Mountains. The
mines in the Cargo Muchachos have been called the most
hazardous in the Southwest. Cave-ins and fires were common.
The miners, especially in the summer, found living conditions
deplorable. The town where the miners and their families lived
was originally known as Ogilby and Hedges, then later
changed to Tumco. Because of the old mining activity, access
to the area has been somewhat restricted.

The Cargo Muchacho Mountains have an interesting future, as
well as a checkered past. Today the price of gold is around
$1,200.00 per ounce. Mining operations no longer tunnel down
1,000 feet or more. Now, they just remove chunks of the
mountain, crush the ore and recover the gold.








One of the last remaining buildings

Discovery of gold in the Cargo Muchacho Mining District is
credited to a mule that strayed while members of a
California-bound wagon train were camped near these
mountains in 1862. When the mule was later found in the
foothills, one sharp-eyed man picked up a nugget at the spot. A
few pieces of float were found, which were traced to quartz
ledges.

Over the years, there were several mines operating in the area
of Hedges. The American Girl Mine produced a good deal of
gold and is now the main site of the current gold mining activity.
The Gold Rock Claims passed through many hands but made
little money, and most of the operators eventually went broke.
The Gold Rock Mine closed in the fall of 1881 when the mill
contract terminated. The mines remained closed until 1889
when a Boston firm purchased the claims. The new owners
decided to move the 15-stamp mill they had been using at
another mine to their new claim.

Some of the Gold Rock claims assayed as high as $150 a ton.
(At $20 an ounce that would be about 7.5 ounces of gold a ton,
a very rich find. Today, a mining company will mine as low as
1/8 ounce per ton of ore.) No one was immediately eager to
begin developing the veins because a 14-mile haul was needed
to get the ore to the nearest mill. A group of California investors
decided to gamble on the Gold Rock mines in 1893 and formed
the Golden Cross Mining and Milling Company.












Looking for gold, some copper on the rocks

The Golden Cross Company was soon facing financial
difficulties because the ore didn't bring the high yield expected,
and they couldn't turn a profit operating the 40-stamp mill they
had built. Management concluded that a simple solution would
be to add another 60 stamps. But with a 100-stamp mill
capacity, the problems became worse. It was necessary to
mine some very poor ore to keep all 100 stamps going, and the
firm went further into debt. Even with gold mining, the basic
rules of business still apply -- in order to make a profit, you
have to sell your product at a price higher then it costs to
produce it. This gold operation was finally sold to a Salt Lake
City investment group which gave one million dollars for the
property and agreed to pay the debts owed by the Golden
Cross Company.

It didn't take long for the investors to realize they had made a
bad deal. Ore from the Gold Rock mines was bringing no better
than $3.10 a ton, and financial disaster was soon staring them
in the face. In an effort to stave off the inevitable, the firm
began cyaniding the thousands of tons of tailings that had
accumulated around the mines over the years. Within two years
they were insolvent, and a receiver was appointed to run the
mines. By 1909, the Gold Rock mines had been deserted, and
Hedges became a ghost town.







But there were still some optimistic folks who thought the Gold
Rock claims could be operated at a profit and The United
Mines Company took them over in 1910. Though all of the old
shafts went down at least a 1,000 feet, they reconditioned the
mill and hired a crew. The camp was rechristened Tumco, an
acronym for the company name. But low-grade ore brought the
enterprise to a halt soon after it was launched.

Today, this open area is managed by the Bureau of Land
Management (BLM). All that remains are a few old buildings in
poor shape and some very dangerous mine shafts that drop a
1,000 feet or more. The locals tell a story about a man trying to
jump one of the shafts with his dirt bike; they say he didn't
make it. Others have tried to climb into the shafts with ropes,
only to be overcome by gas rising from the mines and fall to
their deaths. There is still some gold in the washes near town,
but it's not worth the effort it would take to recover it.









I used a dry washer in the area about 16 years ago and got a
few flakes of gold, but it took four hours of digging to get about
$5.00 worth of gold.









If you're in the area, be sure to stop at the Gold Rock Ranch.
They have a campground, supplies and lots of local history.
The area behind the old town site is now being strip-mined, and
there is some thought of tunneling down to much lower levels to
reach the gold deposits. Let's hope they have better luck than
those mining adventurers of days gone by.
DUNES CLEANUP VOLUNTEER NEED,
BUTTERCUP & OGILBY
- Our past Buttercup Ranger Station
registration station volunteer is not able to help out this year on
January 18th for the dunes cleanup. I need a group of people (2-3)
who are willing to man this registration station. You would need to pick
up supplies/t-shirts Friday night at the ranger station or around
6:30-7am on Saturday morning. You would need to provide a table and
chairs and bring all sign in sheets and supplies back to the ranger
station or to the main stage area (Gordons Well by the public
restrooms) by lunch service. If interested, please contact me at
Charla@UnitedDesertDateway.org. Happy to provide additional
details. Thanks in advance!
philip@bettencourtplans.com
Thu 1/9/2020 3:23 PM

Thank you so much for community news. Happy new year!

Philip F. Bettencourt
Real Estate Development Planning
Newport Beach | La Quinta
949-720-0970

Hi Philip:

Glad you are still reading the blog...and nice to hear from you.

Donna

Every successful individual knows that his or her achievement
depends on a community of persons