It is our desire to help place animals in good, loving homes, but
If you find a lost animal, a hurt animal...dogs, cats, birds, whatever; or just want to
'talk animals.'
This is the spot for you!
Thanks for being good Neighbors!
WE HAVE PROVIDED THE LINK TO THE
RIVERSIDE COUNTY ANIMAL SHELTER FOR ALL
ANIMAL LOVERS...
BE SURE TO CHECK OUT THEIR SITE IN DETAIL

WHAT TO DO ABOUT
BARKING DOGS
What is Dog Walker Watch? Paw Patrol







A crime awareness program that encourages dog walkers
throughout the area to assist as “extra eyes and ears” in the
ongoing crime prevention efforts.

Those who know the neighborhood best (you) now become
more aware and less hesitant to report
suspicious activity.

How Paw Patrol Works

The program trains you how to effectively observe and report
criminal activity as you are routinely out in your neighborhood.

THE GOAL OF PAW PATROL

Let criminals know that dog walkers DO REPORT suspicious
activity. Criminals will then go elsewhere!

THE POLICE NEED YOUR HELP!

What is Suspicious?

People aren’t suspicious, behavior is!

Does the person(s) appear to have a destination?

Is the person(s) in a hurry? (i.e. sense of urgency).

A person or child resisting the advances of another individual.

Unusual behavior: walking to rear of property, canvassing,
unusual mental or physical symptoms.

It’s that gut feeling that something is wrong.

Example Of Suspicious Behavior

An individual knocks on your door and claims to be at the
wrong location, asks for a nonexistent person, or appears
suspicious.

A uniform and clipboard does not mean they are who they
appear to be.
Local canvassing and solicitation laws (time, registration, etc.)

When Should I Call 9-1-1?

Anytime a police response is needed.

REMEMBER:You are not bothering us.

What To Know When You Call

Nature of the emergency:

What is going on?

Description of subject.

Weapons? Time of incident.

Where are you?:

Address, street name,

landmark, location, etc.

Your information:

Your name and your phone number.

Are you available to speak with an officer?

Remember…

Let the operator ask the questions.

Please remain calm and speak clearly.

Inadvertently call 9-1-1?

Don’t hang up.

How Can I Stay Safe?

Break your routine. If you typically walk at 6:30PM around the
block - change it up.

Bring a flashlight at night. And, don’t forget your cell phone.

Lock your door. Keep a television or light on to create the
impression you’re home.

© Dog Walker Watch™ is a registered trademark of National
Association of
Town Watch.
BERMUDA DUNES PAW PATROL
Contact: Donna Hubenthal-Nelson
for Information and Planned Activities
760 772 9053
WELCOME TO THE PET PLACE AND HOME OF
PAW PATROL
We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals
How and When to Care for and Socialize Feral Kittens

When you come across outdoor kittens, you may feel the need to
immediately pick them up and bring them home with you, but that
might not be the best thing for the kittens–or for you. Here are
some guidelines on how to decide if kittens in a colony should be
removed and socialized for adoption, and how to care for them
should you choose to remove them and raise or socialize them
yourself. You can find more in-depth information by ordering kitten
care products from our online marketplace. These guidelines are
just that, and they should not be used as a substitute for
veterinary care.

In addition to the information below, consider looking into Feral
Friends in your area. These are local individuals, organizations,
and veterinarians or clinics that may be able to help with hands-on
advice, information about borrowing equipment, and veterinarians
or clinics that can spay and neuter feral cats. Request a list of
Feral Friends in your area.

1. First Steps When You Find Kittens Outdoors

You’ve got a decision to make. Your first instinct when you see
kittens may be to swoop them up and take them home with you,
but that is not always in the best interest of the kittens—or you.
Socializing and caring for feral kittens is a time-consuming process
which requires devotion, patience, and attention. The decision to
bring feral kittens into your home should not be taken lightly.

Some kittens may need intervention if they are not doing well.
Remember that early weaning of kittens who seem to be doing
well may lead to increased mortality or failure to thrive. Although
kittens begin weaning prior to eight weeks of age, if it's safe they
should remain with their mother until then to learn proper behavior
and socialization.

Before you move forward, consider:

Time:

Do you have the time it takes to socialize kittens? You will have to
commit to caring for them one-on-one for at least a couple of hours
each day, for a period of a few weeks to a month or longer. If the
kittens are neonatal, they will require even more specialized care,
including round-the clock bottle-feeding. Make sure you know
ahead of time what this entails. Sadly, people often bring feral
kittens into their home and then do not take the time to work with
them. Weeks, or months, later, they realize that they cannot touch
the cat—they have feral cats in their home that cannot be adopted.

Adoption Expertise and Connections:

After socializing the kittens, they will need adoptive homes. Do you
have the network—friends, acquaintances, organizations—to help
you find those homes? Finding and screening homes for kittens
takes work. Consider the paperwork required—adoption fees,
forms, and contracts—as well as your ability to get the kittens
neutered before adoption when deciding whether to socialize them
or not.

*Note: Alley Cat Allies recommends early-age spay/neuter. A kitten
can be neutered as long as it weighs two pounds. Learn more.
Kitten Age: Healthy kittens four months of age or older can stay in
their colony, and Alley Cat Allies does not recommend attempting
to socialize kittens older than this. These kittens should be
neutered, vaccinated, and returned to their outdoor home.

How to Determine Kitten Age

- Under one week: (3-8 oz) Eyes are shut, ears are folded down,
and kittens are unable to walk. They can purr and make tiny
noises. The umbilical cord may still be visible.

- One-two weeks: (8-11 oz) Eyes start to open (they are blue) and
focus. Ears begin to open and movement is improved to crawling,
snuggling, and kneading.

- Three weeks: (7.5-14.5 oz) Eyes fully open and ears are open
and standing up. The kitten will start to respond to noises and
movement. The first wobbly steps are taken and baby teeth start
to come in.

- Four-five weeks: (8-16.75 oz) Running, playing, digging, and
pouncing occur often. Kittens will start to wean and will be able to
lap up formula, eat soft food, and use the litter box by themselves.
Eyes have fully changed from blue to their adult color.

- Eight weeks: (2 lbs) Kittens look like little versions of full grown
cats.
FERAL CAT INFORMATION AND WHO TO CALL

The Blog Folks

I live in BDCC, on St George near Starlite. For several years I’ve
been trapping feral cats. My methods are very humane (I’m an
animal person.) In the beginning Animal Samaritans would do
the pick up and return.  However, they no longer provide that
service. You need to bring them in on your own between 730
and 800 am and pick up between 230 and 300 pm. I have  
traps but could use some partnership and will assist others . I
can’t transport them in the morning, but can pick them up at
230 pm. My name is Robert. You can call me at 760-275-3030.
Help me make a difference.
Learn about community cats

Find out how you can get help

Discover how you can help us

These sweet cats deserve the best lives we can give them

TNR COACHELLA VALLEY














We are a NO KILL organization

http://www.facebook.com/TNRCoachella/
Email: DESERTLEUP@GMAIL.COM

We work with all the animal shelters in the valley
and beyond!!

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OTHER INFORMATION
GO TO THE LIST OF
VENDORS
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